Category Archives: Chapter Activities

The Vigilant: January-February 2019

The Vigilant is a publication of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia. For questions or submissions, please send us an email.

Joe Orozco, Editor

From the President’s Desk

We knew 2019 would be a busy year. I don’t know that we could have anticipated just how hectic it would be, but thanks to your help, we continue pushing forward in a way that never fails to make me proud of our membership.

Legislative Activity

Advocacy has been our focus at the start of a busy 2019. This is the core of the National Federation of the Blind, and we have stepped up as an affiliate.

We recognize that these collective efforts take time, money and the talents of a diverse team from throughout Virginia and across the nation. Certainly, names in recognition will be missed, and please know that we are grateful for what we achieve together.

We want to offer special thanks to Mark Roane, Derek Manners, John Halverson, Charlie Brown, Angie Matney, and Earl Everett for their efforts in Richmond and on many calls to address our priorities in Richmond. Please thank them along with all of the team leaders who organized the over 50 members attending Richmond Seminar. Our legislative work is a fluid process, and more specific progress updates can be found via our announcement list.

On a different front, I am truly proud of the Virginia Affiliate’s engagement in the 2019 Washington Seminar. We had great participation including appointments with the entire Virginia Congressional Delegation. Deepa Goraya scheduled appointments, configured our teams across January 29 and 30, and ensured we were prepared for our visits. We had a very strong set of nearly 30 Virginians attending visits. The participation from the Virginia Association of Blind students was especially strong and Virginia students were also very involved in Monday night’s National Association of Blind Students Fiesta. Many of us improved our Salsa dancing with the help of dance pro instructor John Bailey. I am also exuberant that Sandy and John Halverson continued their record of ensuring that our nerve center for Washington Seminar, Suite 275, was a success.

Accessible Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Art

On January 21, members of the Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute and staff members from the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) attended the opening of a new accessible art exhibit. The exhibit included an interactive art display from 3D Photo Works featuring tactile and auditory components you can explore on your own. We are grateful to John Olson from 3D Photo Works and to the VMFA for the opportunity to participate in the grand opening and for the efforts to make art more accessible. The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is open 365 days a year and is free. Please go check out this exhibit in the all new Education Wing. We are also grateful to Kathryn Webster for making the connections for this to be possible.

Virginia Chapter leadership Institute

On Sunday, January 20 and Monday, January 21 we held an extremely interactive leadership development session with participants in the Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute across nine of our chapters. Our Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute co-chairs, Domonique Lawless and joe Orozco, led the programming and ensured we all benefited from this creative and engaging program. As part of their next objective, participants have been asked to identify, engage, and recruit a community partner to help local chapters strenghthen their influence in their local area.

2019 Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind (AER) Conference

The National Federation of the Blind of Virginia was an exhibitor at the AER conference in Charlottesville. We used the opportunity to share details on Project RISE, this year’s residential Braille Enrichment for Literacy and Learning (BELL) Academy, our national scholarship, and other NFB programs and services. We always appreciate the opportunity to be a part of conferences where we can get the word out about our valuable programs and services to Virginia blind residents.

Braille Readers Are Leaders

We are very pleased to announce the winners from Virginia for the 2018-2019 Nationwide Braille Readers Are Leaders Contest. Altogether 74 students from 26 states took part in the contest with the largest number of students coming from Virginia. From Virginia, 26 students participated in the program which is absolutely remarkable. The Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind was specifically recognized and we thank Kittie Cooper for her efforts to promote the program.

Here is a list of the 2018-2019 Nationwide Braille Leaders Are Leaders winners from Virginia:

Grades 4-5

First Place: Noa Hottin, Alexandria, VA, 2503 pages

Grades 9-12

First Place: Samuel Thurston, Chesapeake, VA, 1657 pages

The Kelly Doty Awards are presented in memory of Kelly Doty, a longtime member of the NFB of Illinois who was a dedicated promoter of Braille literacy. These awards are given to students who have coped with extra challenges in order to become proficient Braille readers. Such challenges include, but are not limited to, having disabilities in addition to blindness or being an English language learner.

Here is the list of the students who received this year’s Kelly Doty Awards from Virginia.

Noa Hottin, grade 4, Alexandria, VA
Samuel Thurston, grade 9, Chesapeake, VA

Congratulations to all of these winners, and to the families and teachers who encourage and support them in their reading. Braille readers are leaders!

2019 National convention

The 2019 NFB National Convention is an experience you do not want to miss.
Many of those who have attended our national NFB conventions are amazed at how meeting and interacting with over 3000 other blind and low vision convention attendees has positively changed their lives. They not only learn how the problems of vision loss can be overcome, but also experience the confidence that comes with solutions.

If you have never attended a convention, we offer two programs to assist you in attending the convention and getting the most from the experience.

A) McDonald Fellowship organized by the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia; and
B) Kenneth Jernigan Scholarship run by the National Federation of the Blind

First time convention attendees are strongly encouraged to apply for both.
Below the description of these two separate programs, you will find details on the process for requesting assistance if this is not your first convention.

McDonald Fellowship from the NFB of Virginia

Robert and Marian McDonald selflessly contributed to our Virginia affiliate to further the progress and better the lives of those who are blind, visually impaired, and low vision in Virginia. In their honor, we recognize the personal benefits that come to people who attend a national convention for the first time. In their memory, the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia (NFBV) continues their legacy of education and empowerment to Virginia’s blind citizens.

We anticipate awarding fellowships to assist each recipient with costs of attending our 2019 NFB National Convention to be held in Las Vegas, NV, from July 7- July 12. Please note: The banquet ends late in the evening of Friday, July 12 and fellowship winners are expected to attend the banquet so return travel must occur on Saturday, July 13 or later. This event will take place at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The McDonald Fellowship program was established in 1998 to assist those who have never attended a convention of the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) or those who have not attended in many years and wish to come to a convention this year.

Federationists are welcome and encouraged to apply for both the Virginia specific McDonald Fellowship and a National Kenneth Jernigan Scholarship.

We will link each of our Fellowship winners with mentors who will assist them in getting the most out of their national convention experience.
McDonald Fellowship winners are expected to attend the entire NFB convention and share their experiences by addressing our 2019 NFB of Virginia state convention.

Deadline for applications for the McDonald Fellowship is Monday, April 15, 2019. Winners will be announced May 15, 2019.

Your application should be in the form of a letter delivered via electronic mail. There is no specific form for the application. Applicants should write a brief letter outlining reasons why they should be considered for a Fellowship and the letter must include:

A) Name, Address, phone and email contact information
B) Chapter or other connection with the affiliate
C) How you will benefit from the experience
D) How you have participated with your chapter or the affiliate in the past year
E) Any other pertinent details

In addition, you are required to contact your Chapter President or an affiliate Board Member for a letter of recommendation. Letters of recommendation are due by Monday, April 15, 2019.

Applications or questions about the Fellowship program should be sent to:

Mary Durbin, Chairman
McDonald Fellowship Committee
Email: mrdurbin@cox.net
Phone: 757-472-2495

Our committee wants to help you make 2019 the year you attend our national convention. The convention will be even better because you were there.

The Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship

Allen Harris is the chairman of the Kenneth Jernigan Fund Committee and was one of the people who came up with the idea of honoring our former president and longtime leader by establishing a program to promote attendance at the national convention, where so much inspiration and learning occur. Here is Allen’s announcement about the 2019 Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund Program:

Have you always wanted to attend an NFB annual convention but have not done so because of the lack of funds? The Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund invites you to make an application for a scholarship grant. Perhaps this July you too can be in the Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, enjoying the many pleasures and learning opportunities at the largest and most important yearly convention of blind people in the world.

The three biggest ticket items you need to cover when attending an NFB national convention are the roundtrip transportation, the hotel room for a week, and the food (which tends to be higher priced than at home). We attempt to award additional funds to families, but, whether a family or an individual is granted a scholarship, this fund can only help; it won’t pay all the costs. Last year most of the sixty grants were in the range of $400 to $500 per individual.

We recommend that you find an NFB member as your personal convention mentor, someone who has been to many national conventions and is able to share money-saving tips with you and tips on navigating the extensive agenda in the big hotel. Your mentor will help you get the most out of the amazing experience that is convention week.

Who is eligible?

Active NFB members, blind or sighted, who have not yet attended an NFB national convention because of lack of funding are eligible to apply.

How do I apply for funding assistance?

  • You write a letter giving your contact information and your local NFB information, the specific amount you are requesting, and then explain why this is a good investment for the NFB. The points to cover are listed below.
  • You contact your state president in person or by phone to request his or her help in obtaining funding. Be sure to tell the president when to expect your request letter by email, and mention the deadline.
  • You (or a friend) send your letter by email to your state president. He or she must add a president’s recommendation and then email both letters directly to the Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund Committee. Your president must forward the two letters no later than April 15, 2019.

Your letter to Chairperson Allen Harris must cover these points:

  • Your full name and all your telephone numbers-label them-cell phone, home, office, other person (if any);
  • Your mailing address and, if you have one, your email address;
  • Your state affiliate and state president; your chapter and chapter president, if you attend a chapter;
  • Your personal convention mentor, and provide that person’s phone numbers;
  • Your specific request, and explain how much money you need from this fund to make this trip possible for you. We suggest you consult with other members to make a rough budget for yourself.

The body of your letter should answer these questions:

How do you currently participate in the Federation? Why do you want to attend a national convention? What would you receive; what can you share or give? You can include in your letter to the committee any special circumstances you hope they will take into consideration.

When will I be notified that I am a winner?

If you are chosen to receive this scholarship, you will receive a letter with convention details that should answer most of your questions. The committee makes every effort to notify scholarship winners by May 15, but you must do several things before that to be prepared to attend if you are chosen:

  • Make your own hotel reservation. If something prevents you from attending, you can cancel the reservation. (Yes, you may arrange for roommates to reduce the cost.)
  • Register online for the entire convention, including the banquet, by May 31.
  • Find someone in your chapter or affiliate who has been to many conventions and can answer your questions as a friend and advisor.
  • If you do not hear from the committee by May 15, then you did not win a grant this year.

How will I receive my convention scholarship?

At convention you will be given a debit card or credit card loaded with the amount of your award. The times and locations to pick up your card will be listed in the letter we send you. The committee is not able to provide funds before the convention, so work with your chapter and state affiliate to assist you by obtaining an agreement to advance funds if you win a scholarship and to pay your treasury back after you receive your debit or credit card.

What if I have more questions? For additional information email the chairman, Allen Harris, at kjscholarships@nfb.org or call his Baltimore, Maryland, office at 410-659-9314, extension 2415.

Above all, please use this opportunity to attend your first convention on the national level and join several thousand active Federationists in the most important meeting of the blind in the world. We hope to see you in Las Vegas.

Financial Assistance to attend the 2019 National Convention

Our National convention is a highlight for the year and the 2019 convention will be especially remarkable. The convention will begin Monday, July 7 and end late after the banquet on Sunday evening, July 12. Most people will be departing on Saturday, July 13.

We want everyone to plan this into your calendar and your budget so you can be there to join us.

If you are a first-time attendee, we strongly encourage people to apply to both the McDonald Fellowship and Kenneth Jernigan convention Scholarship programs which target first time convention attendees.

Every year, the affiliate president will receive a few requests for convention assistance from affiliate members. I am putting some ground rules in place to help clarify expectations.
If you are planning to request assistance, please send your request to me in email. Your request should factor in the following:

A) What are my total expected costs: What should I expect to pay for convention factoring in expected costs for travel, lodging, meals, and a banquet ticket and convention registration? I have no idea how much it costs to get from your home to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. You need to do the research. In addition, the banquet is a highlight of the convention and you don’t want to miss it. Many people choose to share rooms and you will start seeing roommate requests posted to our announce list starting soon.

B) What can I afford myself? No one will be going to convention for free. The Jernigan Scholarships and McDonald Fellowships do not provide all the funding for convention for first timers. Individuals requesting financial assistance should expect to make a significant contribution to your convention expenses. You should be factoring in this expense into your budget.

C) What is my chapter contributing? Your chapter is a resource for financial assistance. Do not come to the Virginia Affiliate requesting financial assistance if you have not asked your local chapter. I will be following up with chapter presidents to understand how you are contributing at the chapter level to programming and fundraising.

D) How much are you requesting from the affiliate? After considering other sources, how much are you requesting from the Virginia affiliate. Please note that we do not provide funding in advance. Mark Roane will provide funding at convention but you need to work locally to get your travel and room expenses addressed. You should definitely expect to attend the Virginia Caucus, probably Tuesday evening, July 8 at 10:00 PM to receive the financial assistance. It is not Mark’s job to hunt you down at convention and it is not Mark’s job to provide you funds as you walk into the hotel. However, Mark will gladly sell you some Virginia Peanuts.

Speaking of selling, fundraising is the means through which we have the resources to provide financial assistance. When I talk to your chapter president, I am checking to determine if you are engaged in the chapter and affiliate fundraising. We will certainly be selling items at the Virginia table at convention and you will be expected to help with that activity if you receive financial assistance. You should also plan to participate in working the Independence Market and other responsibilities as we all work together to make the convention a success. You should be hustling throughout convention and afterward back in Virginia to sell our products to fund our movement.

We are asking that requests are submitted no later than June 1, 2019. You should be planning in advance, booking your hotel room and taking advantage of the early registration pricing.

We want everyone to join us in Las Vegas and we hope this guidance clarifies the process. However, if you have questions, I am glad to address them.

As you can see, there is lots already in the works and much to look forward. There is a place for you in all our activity, and if you have not already gotten involved, please talk to us. We need you to help us go out and build the Federation!

Yours sincerely,

Tracy Soforenko, President
National Federation of the Blind of Virginia


This Month’s Words of Inspiration

“There is neither Greek nor Jew, Barbarian nor Scythian, bond nor free. …” Thus spoke St. Paul two millennia ago. And so it must be with us today in this broad land. There is neither Jew, nor Greek, nor African, nor blind man, nor former convict-but only the free man and citizen in the society of equals to which we aspire.”–Jacobus tenBroek, Three Out-Castes of American Society from the February 2019 Braille Monitor


Ringing in the New Year with RISE
By Kathryn Webster, Project RISE Program Coordinator

Each month, our program continues to expand; and each week, our students feel the overwhelming love and positive impact of the National Federation of the Blind. Over the weekend of January 26-27, our Project RISE students and mentors participated in a leadership and self-advocacy seminar coordinated by our national career mentoring program.

Several of our Virginia students from across the state joined with students from Mississippi’s mentoring program for interactive sessions and activities focused on public speaking and leadership development. Students practiced their elevator pitches, team-building, and problem-solving scenarios, considering how they would advocate for themselves in challenging situations. Further, our students shared a banquet dinner with over 35 leaders from the National Association of Blind Students, who were having their leadership seminar in the same hotel.

One student said, “I had a blast this weekend and I am so inspired by everyone.”

It is these moments that prove that the work of our coordinators and mentors pay off, as we influence the lives of Virginia blind youth.

Our state-wide participants are eager to join us in May at our national headquarters in Baltimore, Maryland; and our Northern Virginia students are anticipating our fitness and wellness session on March 2!

For the first time, we were excited to welcome several of our Project RISE students at our Richmond seminar and in our teams on Capitol Hill during Washington Seminar. We are extremely impressed by our Project RISE students and how these growing leaders are showing interest in Virginia student and affiliate activities! It is admirable to see our high school students contributing back to our student division in both leadership and experiential opportunities.

For the next couple of months, we are diligently working to coordinate summer jobs, internships, volunteer opportunities or blindness training programs for many of our students. If your workplace might have an opening for a student intern, or a job-shadow opportunity, please contact the Project RISE coordinators at Nfbprojectrise@gmail.com . More importantly, if you yourself is willing to participate in an informational interview facilitated by one of our students, please let us know as our members are the most valuable to our youth.

We’d like to take a precious moment to thank our continuing mentors: John Bailey, Jeremy Grandstaff, Sarah Patnaude, and Evelyn Valdez. A huge, warm welcome to Joe Orozco of Northern Virginia as he is joining our mentor team for the remainder of this year’s program. As our program expands, so do our mentors, so we’d like to also give a shout out to Michelle Abdi and Jimmy Morris, who are inaugurating our statewide mentor team. Our impact would be minimal without the support and wealth of knowledge from these dynamic leaders in their communities and our Federation family. We look forward to an exciting spring and summer with our Project RISE students!


True North: Discovering the Strength of Your Inner Compass
By Kathryn Webster

Editor’s Note: During the last weekend in January, Kathryn organized a joint conference for Project RISE participants and leaders from the National Association of Blind Students. On Saturday evening, the two groups came together for a banquet and keynote speech that merged the goals of both tracks in one inspirational presentation. Following is the text of Kathryn’s remarks.

We learn from Jillian Michaels that people believe practice makes perfect, but it doesn’t. If you’re making a tremendous amount of mistakes, all you’re doing is deeply ingraining the same mistakes. In high school, I, like many of you, made a ton of mistakes and I am still reflecting each day to ensure I am not making the same errors. In losing my sight quickly and uncontrollably, I let external pressures overtake my autonomy and even my values. I leaned on those who didn’t believe in me as I shaped my future.

Now, I ask myself why? Why did I seek advice from my high school guidance counselor on a weekly basis, when her low expectations were blatant as she pigeon-holed me into colleges that I saw as subpar and incompatible? I had an above average GPA; I proved myself through my scores on standardized tests; I was a Girl Scout Gold Award recipient; I was a cheerleader, ran track, rowed; and the list goes on. On paper, I was worth it. Mostly worth it because, as a blind woman, I felt that I had no choice in the world but to excel more than my sighted counterparts to be given serious consideration in several elements of life. To my guidance counselor, I was not enough solely because of my blindness.

I could have been the valedictorian; still, my disability created this blurred line of what I could and could not do, almost literally crossing out my qualifications to prove that something just wasn’t all there. Still, I craved her approval and expertise throughout one of the most defining choices of my teen age years. Socially, I disguised my insecurities with extreme confidence and poise. I wanted to be known for anything in the world but my blindness. Truthfully, I wasn’t even blind. I was a visually impaired girl who wouldn’t use a cane because I was scared of what the cute boys would think. I say this now; and I am simply mortified.

Back then, it was true. I worked out excessively to make sure I had everything else going for me because this prominent defect could only be overcome by excellence and exception in all other aspects of my life. Again and again, I sought thumbs-up from people that were supposed to matter. I pitied myself but no one would have ever known. On the surface, I was a young independent woman with lots of sass and attitude. Internally, I struggled.

Those repetitive experiences brought me to the lowest point. J.K. Rolling teaches us that rock bottom becomes the solid foundation on which one rebuilds their life. Stripping your core to the bare minimum requires grit, dedication, resilience, and most importantly, loving yourself. While I am not proud of some of the actions and choices I made; I am grateful for the wake-up call that allowed bright red blood to leave a lasting mark on my character, pushing me toward maturity, authenticity, and true confidence. Had you known me six years ago, you probably could have never imagined me as a successful young adult with a bright and challenging career at a top management consulting firm; or the national student president of the most powerful blindness advocacy organization in the world. Had I not encountered those years of struggle and pain, I would never be where I am today.

And now, this idea of leadership and mentorship comes full circle as we reflect on the meaningful conversations had today. We cannot create leaders without guidance from others. Whether formally or informally, those we look up to have a tremendous impact on our actions and decisions as we progress through our lives.

So far this weekend our Virginia and Mississippi students have learned about branding themselves in a positive and powerful light, understanding that teams are made up of talent from all walks of life. Our national student leaders have learned that our actions are watched and admired. We discussed the idea of first impressions and how each motion we make can be scrutinized and observed by anyone at anytime.

This makes me think of a special day in 2015. I was not yet on the NABS Board and I was a sophomore at Wake Forest University. From a title perspective, I was nothing in the National Federation of the Blind. I was in the lobby of the Embassy Suites Hotel in Boston at the annual Massachusetts State Convention. As I was chugging down my much-needed coffee, an energetic and curious 18-year-old guy approached me. He was weirdly impressed that I was put together, smiling with my shoulders back and head held high; he was impressed that I was walking swiftly around the hotel; he was impressed that, in doing these small actions, I was confidently holding a straight white cane in my right hand. This young adult was impressed that I was carrying on with my day as anyone else would, but he was impressed because I was blind.

This young man and I got to talking and I learned that he was losing his vision faster than he could have even imagined or understood. He was frightened; his family was frightened, and he really thought that his chance of being successful was no longer feasible. These feelings of low self-worth hurt my heart so much. Even more, I felt the pain because I had known that same pain just years prior.

So, how do we fix this pain? How do we, as leaders, leave lasting impressions on our youth so they not only understand, but truly believe that they are remarkable individuals with a shot at greatness? Each of us bring a unique perspective to the table. Some demonstrate leadership by example, others by gentle and intentional guidance, and some through encouraging reflection at the individual level. None of these approaches represent the gold star to leadership. For me, I am a direct and intentional leader, emphasizing accountability and growth. I set higher expectations for people than they do for themselves. I do this because I believe. I believe in pushing oneself to the next level because I want each of us to grab onto our untapped potential and thrive. When we don’t have the internal strength to trust in our actions, we will never take risks and develop as ambitious young people. This young man in Massachusetts didn’t believe in himself. In hearing him share his story with me, I saw a spark in him that radiated throughout our whole conversation. He wanted to be a lawyer, a father, and a husband; most importantly, he wanted to give back to this world. In losing his vision, he couldn’t see how that was possible. I left an impression on him that gave him a glimpse of hope. Each of you have the ability to influence others, but that starts at your core.

Three years later, I share this story with so much pride and joy in the young man that is still developing each and every day. He left his home state and local college to gain blindness skills at one of our NFB training centers. He flew across the country to give himself a chance at greatness. Now, he is a student at a top notch school with a killer GPA. He is on his way to law school in the next year. Most significantly, he is giving back to our world in a way he never saw as possible. While the first encounter we had brought me sadness, it brought him a sense of hope. This guy, who is a year younger than me, encourages me every day to be more relaxed, less hard on myself, and to create spaces of greater openness. Each day, I teach him to be diplomatic, intentional in his words, and reflective in his actions. Each day, I am so grateful for that day in Massachusetts because it brought hope to someone I now call a brother.

Syed Rizvi serves as first Vice President of the largest student organization of blind people in the world. Our peer mentorship to each other brings a sense of challenge to both of us. It is stories like these that make me understand that our interactions leave lasting impacts on everyone; but it is on us to initiate those meaningful moments.

“The blindness journey isn’t easy for anyone, but the power of unity and togetherness emphasizes how important it is to advocate for ourselves and others; to pave the path for every single blind person who may walk in the room right after you. We learn from Brad Paisley that “The world tries to clip your wings.”, The National Federation of the Blind makes sure you know that you won’t let the world have that much control. Once, I was insecure and scared of tomorrow. Through my transition to accepting my blindness, I masked those insecurities with confidence. I pushed myself to come off as stronger than I felt inside. In doing so, I recognized my self worth in a way that allowed others to believe it. In our organization, our family, we lean on each other for the pure sense of comfort we so deserve. And, we also learn from our NFB brothers and sisters that there is a world ahead of us that we must grasp onto and run with. Our dreams can start in this room tonight, but it is your ambitious attitude, bright mind, and dedicated soul that will bring these dreams full circle.

I want to leave you with this piece of advice: be true to yourself, be curious about everything, and take risks. You define your future and we are here to witness your achievements. I promise that the doubt that exists within you is felt by so many others. I also promise you that as we tear down society’s misconceptions of blindness, those doubts will continue to diminish. Keep making me proud.


Calling All Blind Parents
By Jessica Reed

Editor’s Note: Jessica Reed hails from the great historical Fredericksburg chapter, our most recent state convention hosts. Given our work on ensuring the equal rights of blind parents, it makes sense that we should jumpstart a dedicated initiative to supplement our advocacy efforts, and who better to usher that mission than the feisty, hard-working mother of two children? Here is her invitation to a preliminary meeting to discuss all the possibilities.

I don’t think any of us can deny what a shining star Virginia is on a national level. We are often in the top five for PAC, we have a thriving senior and student division, we rock at cultivating our future leaders threw our chapter Leadership Enrichment Program! For some time now though, I have noticed that there is one group of blind Virginians we are not tapping into. I am talking, of course, about my self and other blind parents. Until now…

On February 25th at 8:00 PM I would love it if you would join me on the first ever blind parents conference call! A number of states have thriving blind parents divisions that serve the blind parents in a number of ways. Some have provided workshops on the “How-to” of infant care, traveling with small children, and on exploration of which baby supplies is most needed for parents who are blind. Some have broken through the isolation of being a parent on top of a blind parent by holding annual family oriented social seminars. All have woven together a fabric of blind parents who empathize with the frustrations geographically specific to one and other. All have been integral in the passage of the blind parenting bill we have attempted to get passed here for a number of years. I would love to see all on the above conference call on Monday the 25th prepared to shape our Virginia Blind Parents in which ever way would be most helpful to you!

The call information is:

Call in number: 218-895-6875

Access Code: 2018


Top Ten Benefits of Being a Blind Parent
By Jessica Reed

Editor’s Note: Parenting is hard, no matter which way you look at it. In this follow-up piece, however, Jessica points out in no particular order a few items for which we might embrace some advantages as blind parents.

10. When changing a poopy diaper you don’t have to see it.

9. When littles are sleeping, you can still sneak into their bedroom to grab things without turning on a light and unleashing the monster of a woken child.

8. While at a playground, instead of half paying attention to our kids while sitting on the side staring at Facebook on our phones and raging with jealousy over all the ridiculously perfect friends who’s lives seem so much more glamorous, we are the parent climbing the play structure. We are the one’s just making giggly memories to last a lifetime.

7. As stay at home parents, we need to get out and get our children out or we go nuts! When joining support groups (such as MOMS and MOPS) we may need rides to specific events. These are fantastic opportunities to cultivate one-on-one friendships with fellow moms who just get how hard being a stay at home parent can be.

6. In my experience there are two types of parents. There are those types of parents who want to do nothing but talk about their children, and then there are those types of parents who want to do anything but talk about their children. The first group will detail their birthing stories all the way up to how little Susie picked her nose for the first time! The second category of parents love their children and would do anything and everything for them but admit they need a mental break! Yes I am Mama, and I love it, but I’m also Jessica! In parenting groups, whether we like it or not, blindness is something that tangibly separates us from fellow parents. In my experience, Mom’s tend to view this perceived vulnerability as a gateway to connect.

5. Like many things with blindness, there are a number of alternative techniques when it comes to parenting. Whether it’s finding rides, using public transportation, reading to our children in braille, or organizing in a specific way, we are inadvertently teaching our children to think outside the box. There is often more than one way to skin a cat.

4. I have read that children with blind parents become more verbal and descriptive sooner than those with sighted parents. I don’t know if this is true, but my four-year-old daughter has known her right and left since she was three. I never sat down and specifically taught her, but she has often heard others providing me directions while we are walking. At four-and-a-half she has begun describing things around us in new environments… whether I want her to or not.

3. Whether we choose to acknowledge it, our children grow up seeing our differences and struggles. They are born into an idea that life is not always easy. There is struggle. It is how you choose to handle struggle that counts.

2. Studies have shown that children with parents with disabilities tend to grow up to be more compassionate and empathetic people. They are already born into “different.” I take this to mean that our children will be less likely to be afraid of difference, and more likely to befriend those that society segregates and dismisses.

1. Parents who belong to the National Federation of the Blind can raise their children as part of a large and supportive network. You don’t have to belong to the NFB to be a successful blind parent, but the organization does a great job of reminding us we do not have to face this alone.


Facts about Blindness … According to Me
By Joe Orozco

Editor’s Note: The following first appeared on my personal blog at JoeOrozco.com, currently under reconstruction. Please get in touch with your own questions and answers, and who knows, maybe we could create some sort of resource playfully answering some of the more popular curiosities.

What have you always wanted to know about blind people but was always too afraid to ask? My thoughts are not the definitive view on the subject. Contrary to popular assumption, we’re not all related to each other, and our opinions are as diverse as the people that make up this small segment of society. Still, it’s a good start.

Will it offend you if I refer to you as blind?

Actually, “blind” is preferable to visually challenged, seeing impaired, sight handicapped or any of a growing combination of politically correct terms. These attempts at politeness are fumbling conversation starters and only confuse the bottom line that I can’t see as well as you can. There was a point when the fact that I am not totally blind would have prompted me to correct another person’s understanding of my visual acuity, but let’s start with blind and then work our way into color, lighting, and depth.

Has your hearing improved to compensate for the loss of your sight?

A person may concentrate more on his hearing when the eyes don’t work, but concentration is a far cry from the pinpoint sonar people attribute to blindness. Actually, my hearing feels below average compared to what I notice other people pick up. Whatever you do, please do not ever go to the other extreme and raise your voice at me. I’m an easygoing person, but my cane may find its way to your ankle at high velocity. What, I’m blind, and you were in my way!

For what it’s worth, my sense of smell also seems supremely underwhelming.

What is one of the most misunderstood aspects about blindness?

“Blind people are so cool because they don’t judge others by appearance…” Yeah right. First, appearance has more to do with overall presence, not just physical characteristics. Second, we’re every bit as observant as anyone else, and while my ears and nose may not be anything to write home about, I would have never dated a girl whose voice got on my nerves or whose body odor made my skin crawl. Also, don’t be surprised if we ask our sighted friends to give us their assessment of you. I would have personally not have taken a friend’s opinion at face value, but if enough people pointed to the same flaws I might start believing–where there’s smoke, there’s fire and all that. Rest assured your judgment of me will never measure up to the harsh criticisms of a fellow blind person…

What advice would you give to someone who’s just lost their sight?

Blindness is pretty dull as far as disabilities go. Maybe it’s a matter of perception, but I would think we’d be far worse off if we could not hear, walk on two legs, or carry a mental illness that prohibited traditional interaction. No doubt there are representatives of these conditions who would tell you their life is every bit as fruitful as ours and list ways they too are misunderstood. See what I mean about blind people and prejudice? My point is that assuming blindness is the only characteristic; your life will shift to new ways of doing things but is hardly a dramatic alteration.

Did you see that movie? Wait, sorry, did you hear it?

Let’s not get hung up on semantics. Yes, I saw the Harry Potter movies, at least the first three, and I don’t know that the British did the stories justice.

Think of it a different way: I’m pretty sure deaf people could be backhanded as much for what they say as what they sign.

Do you ever get depressed because of your blindness?

I went through my brief periods of depression. I went from good sight to nearly nothing and am therefore aware of what I lost. I don’t know that I ever felt overwhelmed. I had good teachers, high parental expectations and enough blind role models among peers to know things would ultimately be okay. That is not always the case, and if you are one who still struggles with your condition, drop me a note. We’ll talk through it.

Don’t get me wrong. You never stop wishing you could drive a car or see the faces of loved ones. With time you learn to cope and find other ways of enjoying similar sentiments. When the day comes that I am totally blind, I will come back and reread this passage, and I’ll do my best to remember that things did not go completely off the rails when I first started noticing the deterioration of my sight when I was a kid. I have had so many great experiences and have met so many great people that I would otherwise have never met if I weren’t blind.

If you could undergo a surgical procedure to restore your sight, would you?

Any surgical procedure has risks. I could gamble away what little sight I have left, and to take the leap of faith would suggest I am dissatisfied with my current condition. I would give it long thought but would probably pass.

How do you cross lighted intersections without help?

When I had Gator, my first Seeing Eye dog, people assumed it was the dog that did the intelligent crossing. I suppose there could be a way to get around the color blindness, but I am alive today mostly owed to my own common sense and good education. At its simplest, you cross with parallel traffic, which is to say the flow of traffic moving in the same direction as you. There are complicated intersections where the traffic flows aren’t as straightforward as east/west immediately following north/south, or streets crossing at a slant as is true of downtown DC, and in those cases I don’t mind standing at the corner studying the pattern until I feel comfortable enough to venture out. I may look foolish standing out there on the corner, but at least I’ll be around to enjoy people’s comments about my foolishness. Eventually I walk a route enough times to measure the distance between lights, and if I’m in a hurry, I may start paying attention to my parallel traffic halfway down the block to get a rough sense of how much time I have to cross when I arrive at the corner.

Regardless of the intersection, I’ve learned not to follow the flow of pedestrians. Too many people cross on red lights, and I am not one of those people who would jump off a bridge if all my friends got together and decided to do so.

For your reference, guide dogs do not know when to cross an intersection; however, they do know how to intelligently disobey their handler. A guide dog will not cross a street if it sees an oncoming vehicle. It will not deliberately walk a pedestrian off a train platform. Now, one could argue these skills can be attributed to superb training, and maybe that is true. Yet I’m thinking the dog is invested in its own survival. We just happen to be holding its harness.

What are some of the social aspects of being blind you wish people understood?

Speaking for myself, I don’t really look forward to buffet lines. Independence is partially about looking graceful, and in my opinion there is nothing graceful about feeling around for serving spoons and running the risk of dipping a finger in the casserole, embarrassing yourself and making the other guests feel dubious about where your fingers may’ve been. There are methods to handling such tasks of course. You could move your hand inward over the table surface, find the rim of the dish and move around its edge until you find the utensil. I paid attention in my independent living classes. Yet independence is also about seizing conveniences, so you could also just ask someone to help load your plate and go on about your business. I feel far more confident about carrying a tray and drink to my table than I do about navigating someone else’s logic about the way dishes should be laid out.

I walk fast when I walk alone. In fact I experience my own version of pedestrian’s sidewalk rage, but I feel slow and stumbling when walking with someone else because my attention is divided between carrying a conversation and stopping myself from colliding with a lamp post. In some cases I would rather walk with a hand on the person’s elbow to ensure the smooth continuity of both our conversation and our journey. This is especially true in crowded restaurants.

Something else that comes to mind is my attitude about how the rest of the world perceives me. As I grow older it matters less. If truth be told it probably never mattered enough, but there was a point when I wondered about the stain on my shirt or the syrup on my cheek or the rip in my jeans. If you saw either on a fellow sighted person, you would attribute it to laziness or wouldn’t think of it at all. If you saw this on a blind person, however, your first thought might be that it was because the person was blind. I’d like you to point it out to me in the spirit of open communication. No one likes to walk around attracting the wrong kind of attention, but don’t be surprised to discover that I can be every bit as careless or clumsy as you.

When you see me board a train or bus, it’d be nice if you offered me the seat near the door. I will turn you down, but it’s the thought that counts. My independence will not be threatened by the same type of courtesy I would extend if I were sighted and came upon a blind person. To that end, I may not always take advantage of the discounts and freebies offered to senior citizens and persons with disabilities. If I don’t, chalk it up to a desire to equally contribute to society and not because I am an ungrateful person. I worked hard to be a tax payer.

How do you handle household chores as a blind person?

When I cook I first ensure the location of all supplies and ingredients. I memorize the heat level for the dial positions on the stove and oven. I use a fork to test the state of cooking meat or vegetables. I also listen for changes in the way the food sizzles to gauge states of readiness. There are tactile dots on the microwave and other appliances with touch screens. I now rely on my iPhone to keep track of time and will probably use the iPhone in the future to find recipes. Otherwise, I follow basic safety steps like using oven mitts when pulling pans from the rack. If I don’t cook more often, it’s partially because I’m a perfectionist, and what should take an hour to prepare often takes me two. Blind or sighted, nothing works better in cooking than tasting the meal in progress.

The proper way for a blind person to sweep a floor is to do so in bare feet. The idea is that you can feel whether or not you are catching all the dirt and grime. I’m not above such strategies. I just find vacuums much faster. I periodically check with my hand if a wooden floor seems fine. Carpets are a little more difficult, but the way that usually works for me is to vacuum in continuous patterns to ensure every inch is covered at least three times. The same is true of scrubbing tubs, cleaning toilets, wiping counters and washing dishes.

Laundry is straightforward. For the moment I can still distinguish colors, but when I can no longer do so, I have different baskets for lights and darks. I’ve marked the machines. My stepmother would be disappointed to learn I no longer iron as often as I did in high school, or even college, but that too is a process of orientation and using your hands to smooth, flatten and iron in patterns for equal coverage.

Remodeling is also doable. There are blind people far more handier with tools than I will ever be, so let’s just be clear than when I say “remodeling” in my case I mean moving furniture up and down stairs, into and out of trucks and from one end of the house to the other. My point here is that blind people are not inept, really can lift heavy objects, and are perfectly capable of helping you move.

Until then, is there anything I missed? Or, is there something I got wrong? That’s technically impossible since so much of what I wrote is subjective, but alternative views are always welcomed in the Comments.


NFB BELL Academy – Placing Hands on the Future

The NFB BELL Academy helps blind and low-vision children, ages four through twelve, develop the literacy skills that will empower them to achieve their academic goals and live the lives they want. This year, with the assistance of our Wells Fargo partners, we provide opportunities for students to imagine, create, and touch their future and dreams; by not only raising expectations through Braille instruction, but by nurturing their development of tactile arts and graphics. Through the generous support of the American Action Fund for Blind Children and Adults, each student participant in the 2019 NFB BELL Academies will be provided with an intact Sketchpad.

Harrisonburg, Virginia – July 28 – August 2, 2019

The National Federation of the Blind of Virginia will host a residential NFB BELL Academy on the campus of Eastern Mennonite University. Day students are also welcome. Tuition is $500 including a $50 nonrefundable registration fee and includes: lodging, meals and field trips. Scholarships may be available. Transportation is not provided. Families should arrive on Sunday, July 28 between 2:00 and 5:00 pm. Parents are invited to a graduation on Friday, August 2 at noon with a 2:00 pm departure. Please note: Eastern Mennonite University is not a sponsor of the NFB BELL Academy.

For more information contact:

Nancy Yeager
brlteacher13@gmail.com

or

Beth Sellers
bsellers31@gmail.com


Announcements From Winchester

On Saturday, February 23, 2019 from 10 AM to 6 PM the Winchester chapter will be participating in the valley health community wellness festival.
There will be over 100 exhibitors including the Winchester chapter which will be providing information and resources to our community and out reaching to those in our area. Providing support, information and resources.
The festival will take place at the Apple Blossom Mall located in Winchester, Virginia. There will be Health screening test, blood pressure, testing, hearing testing and much more.
We invite everybody to come out. The chapter has been doing this for the last three years and we are proud to be part of our community.

Earlier this month Chapter President Chris Walker delivered a presentation to the Kiwanis Club of Old Town. The Kiwanis Club of Old Town Winchester meets at noon on the second and fourth Monday of each month for lunch and a speaker at the Godfrey Miller Home on Loundoun Street Mall. President Walker addressed the club as part of his overarching plan to better connect and engage with the local community.

And, finally check out this video clip of Chris Walker!


Explore. Connect. Attend NFB EQ!

Attention Blind and Low-vision Students:

Join the National Federation of the Blind at our NFB Engineering Quotient (EQ) program this summer. NFB EQ is a week-long program of hands-on lessons and various recreational activities that does not require a specific level of previous engineering experience. Not a student? Share with a blind or low-vision teen today!

Enriched experiences. New friendships. More independence.

Visit our NFB EQ web page to learn more and to apply!

The Specs

Who: 30 blind and low-vision teens

What: A weeklong summer engineering program

When: June 16-22, 2019

Where: Baltimore, Maryland.

Why: To meet new people, learn new things, and have an exciting adventure!

How: Apply Now!

Applications are due March 17, 2019.

Cost: No registration fee! Read the FAQs for more detail about cost.

Additional Information

* To be eligible to apply students must: be enrolled in grades 9-12 during the 2018-2019 school year in a school (public, private, charter, residential, or home school) in the United States, be blind or have low-vision, and be available to attend the entire program.

* Participant’s transportation to and from the program will be arranged by the National Federation of the Blind. Students will travel to Baltimore on Sunday and will travel home on the following Saturday.

* This is a residential program; students will stay in dormitories at the National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute and all meals will be provided.

What Are People Saying About NFB EQ?

“NFB EQ gave me more confidence to keep doing what I want-no one can stop me! The program opened my eyes to even more options in the field [of engineering] and it gave me some confidence that I can do some mechanical stuff that I didn’t think I could do before.” – Michael, Texas

“I increased my drawing skills at NFB EQ. The tactile drawing board helped me, because I could feel what I drew. Visualizations also have gotten easier [going from drawing to model to prototype]. In engineering, you have to picture an idea in your mind and then draw it before you can build it. When you draw it, you can really see how it’s going to come together.” – Trey, Kentucky

“I am amazed at how the people involved in organizing this program made everything so easy for us. From organizing logistics to making sure the schedule was running smoothly for the students-the whole event was very successful. The staff’s warmth and attention to detail really eased my mind and made me feel good about leaving my son at the program for the week.” Mark (father), North Carolina

“I was looking for a rigorous, highly academic science program that promoted and modeled independence and the National Federation of the Blind was offering everything I was looking for. Still, I was hesitant. What if it wasn’t a good use of my students’ resources, or what if they weren’t safe? My fears were unwarranted, from start to finish. NFB made the health, safety, academic rigor, social experiences, and general well-being of our students paramount. Every detail was professionally planned and handled, ensuring that every moment, for every student, was as meaningful as it could possibly be.” Laura (teacher of the visually impaired), Kentucky

Questions?

Send them to:

Email: STEM@nfb.org>

Phone: 410-659-9314, extension 2418

Mail: National Federation of the Blind

c/o Mya Taylor
200 East Wells Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21230


NFB Newsline: Tapping Your Knowledge

NFB-NEWSLINE Subscribers,

Did you know you can access NFB-NEWSLINE on your iPhone, iPod and iPad through the iOS Mobile App? Whether you want to learn more about NFB-NEWSLINE mobile, or just need a refresher, join us on Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 at:

8:00 PM Eastern
7:00 PM Central
6:00 PM Mountain
5:00 PM Pacific

for an NFB-NEWSLINE mobile training session! You will learn how to gain immediate access to over 70 magazines, how to share breaking news stories on social media, use the global search function to find articles on specific topics, navigating your favorite publication, the differences between publications and subscriptions, and much more.

To participate in the training, please use one of the options listed below.

Join Zoom Meeting on your computer or mobile device.

Tap on your mobile device to be directly connected to the conference call:
+16468769923,,842577801#
Dial:
+1 646 876 9923
Meeting ID: 842577801

We look forward to talking to you on the 26th.


Tech it Out on Accessible Entertainment

We live in the age of smart TVs, streaming, and voice-guided narration. But with all the options for fun can come confusion. That’s why we’re tackling entertainment at our next Tech It Out. We’ll discuss things like:

  • Where to find audio-described content
  • How to get the most out of a Smart TV
  • > What the options are for streaming content

Come to get a few tips, share your experiences, and learn from each other.
Accessing Entertainment with Technology

Date: Tuesday, February 26th

Time: 8:00 PM Central

Phone: +1 929 205 6099

Meeting ID: 468 325 263

One tap mobile: +19292056099,,468325263#

Online: https://zoom.us/j/468325263


Judo “try it” Clinic

Presented by the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission
Washington Metropolitan Association of Blind Athletes

Sunday, February 24, 2019
From 12 noon to 4pm

Presented in cooperation with: Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, College Park Community Center, College Park Judo Club, Hui-O-Judo Beltsville, USA Judo Inc. and the Washington Metropolitan Area Blind Athletes Association (WMABA)
Sanctioned by: USA Judo Sanction # 21072
Site: College Park Community Center, 5051 Pierce Avenue, College Park, MD 20740
(Located near the College Park/University of Maryland Metro stop on the Green line)

Event Director: Kevin Tamai, Godan, Hui-O-Judo Beltsville
Clinician: Lori Pierce – Para Olympic Silver medalist in Judo
Mail entry form, signed waiver to: Kevin Tamai, 2973 Fox Tail Court Woodbridge, VA 22192
Online registration Judo Try It Registration

Information: For more information contact Kevin Tamai at 703-622-6861
If you need transportation assistance from the metro to the community center, please contact us.

This “Try it” event is targeted at our local blind and low vision friends in the Washington Metropolitan DC area. It is part of the National Fitness challenge presented by the United States Association of Blind Athletes.

Come “Try judo” with us

We extend a personal invitation to you to come, experience, discover and enjoy the sport of judo. We encourage character development, achieving personal goals, improving fitness, developing proficiency, promoting sportsmanship and enhancing physical training. Judo is an Olympic sport founded by Dr. Jigoro Kano in 1882. Judo, which is translated to “gentle way”, prescribes the principle of flexibility in the application of the techniques. This is the flexible or efficient use of balance, leverage and momentum in the performance of the techniques. Skill and timing are the essential ingredients for success in judo, rather than brute strength.

GO MWABA

The Metro Washington Association of Blind Athletes (MWABA) is a 501(c)(3) organization of blind athletes and their sighted peers who believe that recreational and competitive sports opportunities should be open to everyone, regardless of their ability to see. We hold programs for blind and visually impaired youth and adults from Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia to discover new sports or practice familiar ones in an open and welcoming environment. Our mission also includes teaching blind athletes the physical techniques and body movements that they may not have had a chance to learn through physical education classes. We also share the best way to teach athletic and kinesthetic skills to the blind and visually impaired population with educators in our area. MWABA events are all about trying new things, meeting new friends, staying or becoming fit, and having fun! We support one another in achieving a fit and active lifestyle.

Judo is one of many activities that MWABA is a part of. Before learning to throw an opponent, or being thrown himself; the student is first taught the history, customs, and courtesies of Judo. The next lessons deal with the art of body protection (Ukemi, the art of falling without pain or injury); and the principles of balance. In addition to 40 throwing techniques, Judo includes: hold-downs, choking techniques, and arm locks… all of which can be safely used in contests of sport judo as well as self-defense. Adapting the sport to those with visual impairments simply requires participants to maintain contact while sparring.

Other activities MWABA provides:

Goalball is the only team sport specifically designed for the blind. It is played by men and women around the world, including in the Paralympics. MWABA launched its Goalball program in June 2015, by hosting a Goalball clinic at Trinity Washington University.

Yoga – Our Yoga program now meets regularly at Bluebird Sky. The studio is at 3101 12th St. NE, near the Brookland/Catholic University metro station. The instructors would like folks to sign up in advance if possible so they know how many people to expect, and you can do that by going to this link and selecting Eyes Free Yoga from the list of workshops.
Get more flexible…develop muscular strength…take advantage of all the benefits that Yoga has to offer. Our volunteer instructors aim to provide excellent instruction for all of our visually impaired participants, and provide one-on-one help when necessary. These classes are open to everyone, but priority will be given to visually impaired participants. Please contact Karla Gilbride at karla.gilbride@gmail.com to find out when the next class will be held.
Tandem Cycling
We have rides on Thursday evenings from either the Bethesda or Eastern Market Metro stations. For more information contact Karla Gilbride at karla.gilbride@gmail.com.

Running Groups – In conjunction with the DC chapter of Achilles International, MWABA organizes weekly group runs/walks where blind athletes can partner with a guide and run, jog or walk outside for whatever distance is comfortable for them. To learn more about these group workouts, visit us online, or email irwin.e.ramirez@gmail.com.

We can be reached by phone, Monday through Friday, between 9:00am and 5:00pm.
Karla: (202) 631-2426 or Justin: (941) 585-9503

Visit our website at www.gomwaba.org

More about Judo

Dr. Kano felt that healthy social attitudes, as well as a sound mind and body, could be developed through the proper judo training. He stated this philosophy of Judo in the form of two maximums. The first maxim, “Maximum efficiency,” means that whatever one does, it should be with the optimal use of one’s mental and physical energy. In judo, you learn how to make the most effective use of both body and mind. The second maxim, “mutual welfare and benefit,” simply means that we should be considerate of and helpful to others. In Judo, the students quickly learn cooperate and help each other to advance in their training. This is basically the idea of give and take. This concept of cooperation can all be applied in our association with others in life. The final aim or goal of judo, as expressed by Dr. Kano, is self perfection or “the harmonious development and eventual perfection of human character.” Simply stated, the true goal of Judo is to make a person the best that they can be.”

Judo is many things to different people. It is a fun sport, an art, a discipline, a recreational or social activity, a fitness program, a means of self-defense or combat, and a way of life. It is all of these and more. Judo was introduced into the Olympic Games in 1964 and is practiced by millions of people throughout the world today. People practice Judo to excel in competition, to stay in shape, to develop self-confidence, and for many other reasons. But most of all, people do Judo just for the fun of it. As in all sports, Judo has a strict set of rules that governs competition and ensures safety. For those who want to test their skills, Judo offers the opportunity for competition at all skill levels, from club to national tournaments, to the Olympic Games. There are separate weight divisions for men and women, and boys and girls. Judo is best known for it’s spectacular throwing techniques but also involves considerable grappling on the ground utilizing specialized pins, control holds, arm locks, and Judo choking techniques. Judo emphasizes safety, and full physical activity for top conditioning. Judo is learned on special mats for comfort and safety.

Judo is unique in that all age groups, both sexes, and most disabled persons can participate together in learning and practicing the sport. Judo is an inexpensive, year-round activity, that appeals to people from all walks of life. Many people over sixty years of age enjoy the sport, as well as very young boys and girls.
Judo develops self-discipline and respect for oneself and others. Judo provides the means for learning self-confidence, concentration, and leadership skills, as well as physical coordination, power, and flexibility. As a sport that has evolved from a fighting art, it develops complete body control, fine balance, and fast reflexive action. Above all, it develops a sharp reacting mind well-coordinated with the same kind of body. Judo training gives a person an effective self-defense system if the need arises.

Benefits of Judo for the visually impaired. While taking part in sports or competitions is a highly recommended pastime for everyone, such activities assume particular importance in the case of persons afflicted by physical or sensory handicaps. Far and above the inherent objectives of all physical and sporting activities, it represents for them, a means of escape from a sometimes sedentary existence and from the isolation often imposed by a disability. For blind persons and those with low vision, Judo can be instrumental in (re)attaining independence of movement and in developing physical capacities which permit better adaptation to everyday life. Blindness can cause certain motor problems such as difficulty in attitude integration and body-awareness (since sight is an important factor here); balance problems; problems with motor co-ordination; posture problems; and orientation difficulties. Apart from the numerous motor and physical qualities which Judo helps to develop in people with normal health, it is perhaps, useful to mention the manner in which these are indispensable for blind people.

Falling: It is essential for a blind person to learn to fall in a suitable manner, since uncertainty of movement, due to blindness, often leads to painful falls. By learning secure positions, blind people can avoid accidents in everyday life.

Balance: This is a fundamental element of Judo and an indispensable factor for the blind. It helps to encourage the visually impaired person’s integration in space.

Exercise: Just like sighted people, a blind child must learn to develop his or her physical capacities. He/she will then be able to know and control the body better. Improved control over the motor forces, such as strength, speed and agility, will provide a weapon to combat the consequences of blindness which can otherwise include a sedentary existence.

Kinesthetic sensations: It can be said without exaggeration that blindness does not constitute a serious problem for a Judoka. In practice, seeing persons do not look at their opponents during combat; they try to distribute their strength and adapt their behavior. A blind person is, therefore, not impaired in the discovery of these physical sensations or in their refinement. It is the perception of the strength and behavior of the opponent which induces the choice of the appropriate reaction. Sight does not play a preponderant part in this process.


NFB Pledge

I pledge to participate actively in the effort of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its constitution.

The Vigilant: October 2018

The Vigilant is a publication of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia. For questions or submissions, please send us an email.

Joe Orozco, Editor

From the President’s Desk

We hope you took some time to enjoy the start of a gorgeous Fall and appreciate our many blessings. In our household, the key topics in our home are college applications and the National Federation of the blind of Virginia Convention.

2018 National Federation of the Blind of Virginia Convention

The theme for this year’s convention is diamonds in the Federation: Building Our future. We are implementing programming that highlights our past, our present, and our future. Preparations for the 60th Anniversary Convention of the National Federation of the blind of Virginia are at a frenzy. The agenda will be published later in October and we are really proud of the program we are building together.
To make it truly special, you need to join us and invite some friends to come with you. We need you to help encourage others to participate in this year’s convention.

As a reminder, the southbound bus originally scheduled to depart after convention had to be cancelled due to lack of interest. The twelve prospective passengers who had previously expressed interest will need to find alternative transportation.

Finally, on the point of state convention, remember I am still looking for personal stories, accomplishments and successes, that can be incorporated into the presidential report. The presidential report is a highlight of all our victories across this affiliate family. Please help me showcase the best of our work over the past year. If you have something to share, please do so by Sunday, October 28.

Project RISE Growing State Wide

I am truly thrilled by the success we are experiencing with Project RISE. We had 15 students at our Northern Virginia kickoff event in September. The students learned to barbecue and I was grateful to enjoy the last burger at this vibrant event. We have nearly thirty students signed up for the program and the program is still growing. Our students are having a remarkable experience and they are sharing the program with their friends. Expect to see many of these students at our state convention. If you know students between the ages of 14-21, have them check out our web site: RISE.NFBV.org or contact the coordinators at NFBProjectRISE@gmail.com.

Please note that in order to fully participate at the Project RISE specific programming at the state convention, we need students to apply to the program in early October. Details on applying online can be found at the web site listed above.

Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute

I am thrilled to share that we have 10 participants in the Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute with the program kickoff event scheduled for Thursday, November 8 at the state convention.

The following individuals are signed up to participate.

  • Naim Abu El Hawa
  • Marc Canamaso
  • Annette Carr
  • Susie D’Mello
  • Mike Davis
  • Brittany Crone Ingram
  • Jimmy Morris
  • Sarah Patnaude
  • Christopher Walker
  • Kathryn Webster

Virginia Affiliate Nominating Committee

All elected officers are up for re-election at the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia State Convention. I am pleased to announce the members of the 2018 Virginia Affiliate Nominating Committee. The committee members are:

  • Fred Schroeder
  • Corlis Jones
  • Domonique Lawless

Virginia Affiliate Audit committee

the following individuals have agreed to serve as the 2018 Virginia Affiliate
Audit Committee

  • Andre Tines, Chair
  • Jacki Brown
  • Sean McMahon

Visiting Chapters

I am excited to participate in the October 13 River and Bay Chapters Walk with the Blind. Hopefully, you can come join with other Federationists at this event or at one of the many Meet The blind events within your local community.

There’s a whole lot going on. Please, make it out to state convention. We would really love to see you, and please bring friends into the family reunion.

Yours in service,

Tracy Soforenko, President
National Federation of the Blind of Virginia


This Month’s Words of Inspiration

“During the past year, the blind of this nation have enjoyed continued success, expanding our participation in all aspects of society. Blindness does not define us or our future, but we are often limited by the low expectations and artificial barriers others put in our way. Despite these barriers, we seek equality of opportunity, and we strive to have full access to the rights and responsibilities afforded to all other Americans. Since 1940 we have found that the most effective means for us to reach full participation in society is for us to work together. When individual blind people come together in local communities, through state organizations, and as a whole in our national movement, we represent an authentic and powerful force for innovation, influence, and inspiration that cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Together, we are the National Federation of the Blind.”–Mark Riccobono, President, National Federation of the Blind, from this year’s national presidential report


Platinum Sponsor:
Free Aira Site Access at National Federation of the Blind State Conventions

The National Federation of the Blind has partnered with Aira to provide free Aira Site Access to NFB members during our 2018 state convention. Aira subscribers who are National Federation of the Blind members can use the service at our convention for free without having minutes deducted from their plans. In addition, those interested in Aira have the unique opportunity to try out the service for free while at our convention. This convention-wide, free site access is available only at NFB state conventions, giving NFB members an exclusive opportunity to test-drive Aira in a convention setting.

Aira allows blind individuals to connect via live video to a trained agent through a mobile app or wearable glasses to get real-time visual information or assistance. Learn more about Aira and special pricing available for NFB members at go.aira.io/NFB.

How it Works

Before you head to convention or as soon as you get there, download the free Aira app from the App Store, and create a guest account if you are not already an Aira subscriber. Also, make sure your phone’s GPS feature is enabled. When you enter the convention Site Access location, your phone will receive a notification letting you know that the space you are in is part of the Aira Network. When you connect with an agent, he or she will also confirm that you are now covered by the network, and no minutes will be deducted from your account.

When you leave or enter convention areas that are covered by the Site Access network, you will be informed by the Aira agent.

To learn more about Aira and the special plan available exclusively to NFB members, visit go.aira.io/NFB.


Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired: ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC MEETING

During the fall of 2018, the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) will conduct three public meetings providing stakeholders an opportunity to make comments regarding DBVI programs and services. DBVI seeks input regarding agency strategic planning, development of agency policies and procedures, and implementing services and supports to potentially eligible and eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deafblind. DBVI is particularly interested in comments regarding the following programs, services, and divisions:

  • Independent Living/Rehabilitation Teaching
  • Low Vision Services
  • Deafblind Services
  • Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired Programs
  • Rehabilitation Technology Services
  • Vocational Rehabilitation and Workforce Services
  • Library and Resource Center Services
  • Virginia Industries for the Blind
  • Virginia Enterprises for the Blind

The next public meeting will be:

Fredericksburg Area

In Conjunction with the National Federation of the Blind

State Convention

Fredericksburg Hospitality House Hotel and Conference Center
2801 Plank Road
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401

November 9th, 2018

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Written and e-mail comments may be submitted prior to December 31, 2018 to:

Susan K. Davis, Policy and Training Coordinator, DBVI
397 Azalea Avenue
Richmond, VA, 23227
Susan.Davis@dbvi.virginia.gov
804-371-3140/1-800-622-2155 (Voice/TTY).

Individuals requiring interpreters or other special accommodations should contact Susan K. Davis (800-622-2155) at least two weeks prior to the meeting to request the preferred accommodation.


Introducing You to the Hospitality House
By Joe Orozco

Daring to describe the layout of a hotel to a bunch of blind people is, quite frankly, a little daunting. I don’t have the knack Mrs. Jernigan has, and so I’m sure one or two of you will arrive at the hotel property and immediately pick up on three or four things that were poorly described. If my descriptions confuse you, and you get lost, get your phone out and use that Aira service I keep hearing about.

Special thanks to my daughter, Vicky, who ventured out with me to Fredericksburg back in August, in part, to help prepare this description for you.

The hotel is roughly shaped like a U, except the top of the U has a portion that juts out. This protrusion is where Ledos Pizza, the front desk and main lobby, the Palm Room, and Shannon’s Grill are located. In the center of the U shape is the courtyard, swimming pool, and gazebo are located.

Now, let’s break this down a little.

You’ll be greeted by an automatic door at the front entrance. Immediately to your left will be a small seating area. Walk a few steps forward , past this seating area, and on your left will be a pillar and daily events stand. Walk around the pillar, and you’ll be at the front desk. If you were to follow the corridor left of the front desk, you would come to a set of restrooms on your right. Ledos Pizza is at the end of this corridor.

To the right of the front desk is a staircase that will take you to the second floor. When you get to the top of this staircase, make a U-turn, and you’ll end up at the Fredericksburg Ballroom. This is the ballroom students will use for the vast majority of their activities. The only other meeting space we will use on the second floor is the Commonwealth Room, and this will be for the parents’ luncheon and business meeting on Saturday afternoon.

Okay, come back down with me to the lobby. To the right of the staircase is another small seating area. To the right of this little seating area is a short corridor primarily used by staff. The Palm Room, however, is located at the end of this short corridor. The Palm Room will be used on Thursday evening for CLI participants and a couple other breakout sessions, but the important thing to note about the Palm Room is that there are doors in this room that lead out into the courtyard, and cutting through the courtyard is a quicker way to get to the conference center. I’ll describe the courtyard for you momentarily.

Back to the lobby, and to the right of the short corridor is Shannon’s Grill with another small seating area and piano located just outside its doors.

If you’re not confused by now, you’re my new hero. So, let me recap what we have so far. Come in through the sliding glass doors. Walk forward until you find the pillar on your left. I’m going to use this pillar as a reference point. This means that the front entrance is now at your 6:00. The small seating area is at your 7:00 and 8:00. The corridor taking you to Ledos Pizza and the restrooms are at your 9:00. The front desk is at your 11:00. The staircase to the second floor is at your 12:00. The seating area adjacent to this staircase is at your 1:00. The short corridor taking you to the Palm Room is at your 2:00. Shannon’s Grill and the piano are at your 3:00. Described this way, it sounds like a huge lobby. It’s actually not. It’s pretty cozy, but it does feel a little busy considering all the options.

Now, just to tick you off a little, this is the first of three lobbies. This is officially called Lobby 1.

Remember, all of this is located in that protrusion part of the U shape.

Alright, now, if you were to come into the hotel and make an immediate right, you would enter into a long hallway. This hallway is located to the right of Shannon’s Grill with windows running along your right side. The fitness room is located at the end of this corridor on your right, just past an emergency exit door. You’ll know you passed the fitness room if you hit a set of four steps. If you can’t do steps, there is a ramp on your left. Going up these steps will take you into the sleeping quarters and into what is considered A Wing. This is the left side of the U shape.

Stay with me, because after you go up that short set of steps, you are now on the second floor of the hotel. Hey, what can I tell you. This thing was built on a hill.

The first set of elevators will be on this sleeping corridor on your left. That’s right. There are no elevators in proximity to the front desk. Yes, I was perturbed too.

When you hit the soda machine and ice machine on your left, you will make a left into B Wing. You’ll hit a short hall, make a hard right and another hard left, and start down a new corridor. This is the bottom of the U shape, and this too primarily consists of sleeping quarters.

When you get to the end of B Wing, you’re going to hit a dead end. Making a left will take you to additional sleeping rooms. Making a right will empty you out into a large open area that is Lobby 2. There’s another soda machine and snack machine immediately on your right. There’s a large seating area arranged out in front of you.

If you make an immediate left U turn, you’re going to find a staircase leading you back down to the first floor and into what is C Wing, the conference center. This makes up the right side of the U shape.

OK, so at the bottom of the stairs we’re going to use another clock face. This is Lobby 3. At the center of Lobby 3 is a seating area. This is where we will hold our pre-banquet reception on Saturday evening.

The Patrick Henry room is to your right, or 3:00.

There’s a set of restrooms at your 2:00.

The Governor’s Room is at your 12:00. The Governor’s Room will serve as our affiliate office, and I don’t really want you in there unless you are a board member, working registration, working the auction, working exhibits, or got permission from someone working these areas to visit in there. The office will be locked overnight if anything valuable needs to be stored.

To the left of Governor’s Room, at your 11:00, is an elevator. This is the most convenient means to reach the Presidential Suite on the third floor. The only other space we will use on the third floor is the Executive Lounge, which is where childcare will be held.

Now, if you were to come down those stairs and make a left, you’ll be in a long corridor, or C Wing, the right side of the U shape. On your left will be floor to ceiling windows and exit doors that take you out into the courtyard. On your right will be doors leading into the Presidential Ballroom.

When the ballroom is opened without partitions, it is called the Presidential Ballroom. When the partitions go up, the rooms, starting immediately on your right and extending toward the end of the corridor, the rooms are: Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe. Washington and Monroe, at both ends of the large ballroom, are the larger of the four rooms. Jefferson and Madison are the smaller partitions.

The Washington Room, the partition closest to you, is where the Information Table and Audio team will be stationed. This is also where assistive listening devices can be checked out.

The Monroe Room, the partition farthest away from you down the corridor, is where we will hold the Exhibit Hall.

After Monroe, at the very end of this C Wing, there is a staircase taking you up to the upper floors.

The courtyard can be accessed through doors directly across from Washington and Monroe. The courtyard is a rectangular shape. There is grassy area, a pool, and a gazebo located here. The dog relief area will be directly across the gazebo, but at the time of this writing, I have not gotten a specific pinpoint, so please ask hotel staff to direct you or one of our marshals. They will be told where to find the designated spot.

Remember, the courtyard can also be accessed via the Palm Room. If you go out that way, you’ll come out onto a patio. The patio is on an upper level. You’ll need to walk down steps down into the courtyard level itself.

To use cardinal directions, the Palm Room is at the northwest corner of the courtyard. In the northeast there’s a parking lot and the dumpsters. The conference center, or C Wing, runs along the east of the courtyard. B Wing is at the southern boundary, and A Wing is on the west.

Again, if you get lost, use Aira, or ask one of our friendly marshals to point you in the right direction. Yes, this property is a little more confusing than the Westin last year, but once you get a rough feel for the layout, you’ll be the one helping others get oriented.


It is not about chapter size. It is about chapter effectiveness
By John Bailey, President – Fairfax Chapter

Over the years, I have had the pleasure of visiting many of our state NFB chapters.

One common wish I heard from chapter leaders was that they were frustrated because they didn’t have the membership numbers they wanted. After listening to them for a while, I realized they were comparing themselves to some idealized group with lots and lots of members, resources, and money in the bank.

I can understand their frustration and how easy it is to compare yourself to some ideal. But, the truth is that not every NFB chapter can be a mega chapter. And, that is a good thing.

The vast majority of chapters live in areas with less than ideal transportation options and low blind population densities. This is why there are so few mega chapters. People need to easily and affordably get to meetings and that isn’t always possible everywhere in the state.

So, if you can’t be a mega chapter, does that mean your humble little chapter is a failure? Absolutely not. Here is why.

A chapter is a chapter even if it has less than a handful of members. Limited transportation options and small chapter membership has no impact on how effective your chapter can be in your community. A small chapter can do as much as a mega chapter in terms of educating the public about the ‘truth about blindness’ while giving the local vision impaired a comfortable place to ask questions and have a good time with their peers. In fact, having lots and lots of small chapters throughout the state can be a very good thing. First, we are able to include those vision impaired in rural communities who could really use us. Second, having representation in as many regions as possible gives us clout when it comes to voicing our concerns to our legislators. They love constituents and having lots of chapters gives us that leverage.

The bottom line is, the vast majority of NFB chapters are not mega chapters. In spite of that, they are very effective in their educational outreach to the general public and to their local neighbor blind who need them the most.


Tech it Out! NEW Technology and Food Discussion

Did you see what Hadley’s been up to? Apparently they’re holding monthly conference calls to talk about different technology options. Here’s one of their latest announcements:

Our first Tech it Out discussion on grocery delivery services was terrific! So many of us shared experiences and questions that we didn’t get to the second segment: tapping into online restaurant delivery and cook-at-home meal kit delivery services. So that’s what we’ll do for our next discussion.
Call in and hear a few tips from Hadley and have a chance to share your own questions and experiences with these restaurant and food kit delivery services.

Tech It Out Discussion: Food, Part 2: Restaurant and Meal Kit Delivery

Date: Tuesday, October 30
Time: 8 PM Central
Phone number: (408) 638-0986; Code: 394939348#
iPhone one-tap: US: +14086380986,,394939348#

And for those who weren’t able to join the last call, here’s a link to the recording. Free of Charge. Open to All. Spread the Word.

Ricky Enger,
Hadley
Technology Learning Expert
“>link to the recording. Free of Charge.

Open to All. Spread the Word.

Ricky Enger,
Hadley
Technology Learning Expert


NFB Pledge

I pledge to participate actively in the effort of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its constitution.

The Vigilant: August-September 2018

The Vigilant is a publication of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia. For questions or submissions, please send the editor an email.

Joe Orozco, Editor


From the President’s Desk

I hope you took some time to enjoy some end of Summer fun with friends and family. We just brought my older daughter down to college for her sophomore year and my younger daughter is getting ready for her senior year of high school. Wow, does time fly.

2018 National Federation of the Blind of Virginia Convention

We are ramping up for the 60th Anniversary Convention of the National Federation of the blind of Virginia. Plans are coming together and you should expect this convention to be extraordinary. But, to make it truly special, you need to join us and invite some friends to come with you. Tremendous effort goes into making the convention experience valuable to all. We need you to help encourage others to participate in this year’s convention.

Details on the convention will be provided throughout the month. Some highlights we can share at this time include:

  • Diamond Anniversary Celebration – Uricka Harrison, Sarah Patnaude, and Joe Hobson are planning special events for our 60th Anniversary.
  • National representative – Our national Representative, James Gashel, will be truly inspiring. Jim has been a key player in many of the major decisions of the past 50 years and he has a powerful understanding of where we have been and where we are going.
  • Training Opportunities – Dan Wenzel, Director of Blindness Learning In New Dimensions (BLIND Inc.) our NFB training center in Minnesota, will be joining us for this year’s convention. We will have presentations on Project RISE, Summer Work Experiences, and the Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired.

We are currently working on the agenda and will provide the full agenda in October.

Southeast Regional Student Seminar

The Southeast Regional Student Seminar, held August 10-12 at the NFB Jernigan Institute in Baltimore, was a powerful experience for the 50+ students from across 10 states. It was a pleasure to work with student leaders on Friday morning for a great program to grow their leadership potential. Robert Parsons, President of the Virginia Association of Blind Students, played a key role in the planning of this outstanding event and there were over 10 Virginia students and many leaders from across the Commonwealth invested in the programming. John Bailey joined me in working with students on Friday evening and Saturday and everyone had a blast. The students were really impressive and they were eager to learned from leaders and share their experiences.

Project RISE goes State Wide

Our pre-employment transition service for students 14-21 is now running 2 concurrent tracks. Based on the success of our Northern Virginia pilot, we are continuing with the Northern Virginia program running 1 Saturday a month between September and May with summer work experiences. Additionally, we are launching a state-wide program where students will meet quarterly (at events like the state convention and a weekend at the Jernigan Institute) and will work with our mentors throughout the year to develop their skills. We want to share details on the program with all eligible students and encourage people to go to our Project RISE web site, or contact the coordinators via email, nfbprojectrise@gmail.com

Please note that in order to fully participate at the Project RISE specific programming at the state convention, we need students to apply to the program in September. Details on applying online can be found at the web site listed above.

Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute

As voted upon at our August 4 affiliate board meeting, the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia will shortly be launching the Chapter Leadership Institute, a training program designed to cultivate tomorrow’s leaders at the chapter and affiliate levels. The Chapter Leadership Institute (CLI,) will replace the former Leadership Fellows Program as well as the Virtual Chapter Retreat. The Virginia Chapter Leadership Institute (CLI) is a bit different from past programs because we are not convinced we have all the answers in-house. We will balance use of Federation leaders and outside resources to grow chapter and affiliate leaders. Our focus is strong and vibrant chapters where we have many people sharing the load and working together.

Growing leaders in our movement is essential to our organizational success. It is vital to the continued success of our chapters and the Virginia affiliate. Most leaders in our movement remember that someone invested time and effort to develop them into the leader they are today. We know this is important to each chapter’s continued evolution and vitality. Chapter presidents have been tasked to recommend people for the program by September 15. If you yourself are interested in being considered for the program, I encourage you to please have a candid conversation with your chapter president.

The CLI will be coordinated by Joe Orozco of the Prince William Chapter and Domonique Lawless of the Richmond Chapter, both of whom have experience working for the Federation at various levels of the organization.

Visiting Chapters

It is an honor to participate in chapter programs and activities. It was a pleasure to participate in the 8/18 Potomac Chapter Auction and the Greater Alexandria 8/26 Strategic Planning Workshop.

Please let me know what your chapter is up to and maybe I can attend.

As always, I am encouraged and inspired by the work of our affiliate. You are a very important part of changing the lives of the blind. Please continue working alongside me. I believe together we really can bring about improvements anywhere our blind brothers and sisters meet challenges.

Yours in service,

Tracy Soforenko, President
National Federation of the Blind of Virginia


This Month’s Words of Inspiration

“It never ceases to amaze me: we all love ourselves more than other people, but care more about their opinion than our own.” – Marcus Aurelius


2018 NFB of Virginia Scholarship Program
By Brian Miller, NFB of Virginia Scholarship Chair

Deadline – Tuesday, September 25, 2018 at 11:59pm

The NFB of Virginia is pleased to announce the launch of its James F.
Nelson merit scholarship program for the academic year 2018-2019. Up to three scholarships of $1500.00 will be awarded based on academic achievement, community engagement, and leadership potential.

The NFB of Virginia believes that all blind and visually impaired students who apply for one of our scholarships can benefit from the experience of attending the state convention. As such, the NFBV will cover reasonable costs associated with attending the convention for all eligible applicants, including a room at the hotel shared with a fellow scholarship applicant, most meals, and the cost of registration and a banquet ticket. Scholarship applicants should work with their local chapter to explore transportation options, and should notify the scholarship committee if they encounter difficulties. Applicants are expected to pre-register in order to signal their intention to attend the state convention and to assist the scholarship committee to make hotel reservations.

To be eligible, all applicants must:

  • Be legally blind or have a visual impairment that qualifies them to receive services under IDEA or from a state vocational rehabilitation program;
  • Be a resident or be attending an accredited institution of higher education full-time in Virginia;
  • Plan to pursue a full-time, postsecondary course of study in the
    2018-2019 academic year; and

  • Participate in the entire NFB of Virginia state convention and in all scheduled scholarship program activities to be held November 9 to 11, 2018, in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

To obtain an application, go to www.NFBV.org.

For a Word version of the application, email our scholarship chair.


Convention Operations Report
By Joe Orozco, Chairman

My name is starting to pop up more frequently in your inboxes. Sarah is cranking up the social media channels. Tracy is fighting extra hard not to look his age. It must be state convention season!

Alright, here are the main highlights:

Convention Registration

There are 3 ways you can pre-register for the convention.

1. Register online via the Brown Paper Tickets site.

2. Call Toll Free: (800) 838-3006 to speak with a Brown Paper Tickets representative.

3. Download the Pre-Registration form from our convention landing page and mail it with payment included to:

NFB of Virginia
3230 Grove Avenue
Richmond, VA 23221

By pre-registering, you will save $10 on the registration fee and $5 on your banquet ticket. Pre-Registration ends on October 26.

Remember, if you pre-register, you are automatically entered into a drawing for $100.

Hotel Accommodations

The Convention will be held Friday, November 9 through Sunday, November 11 , 2018. Take note that programming will begin at 9 AM Friday morning, so take advantage of the discounted rates to arrive Thursday evening, if your schedule allows.

Hotel information is as follows:

Fredericksburg Hospitality House Hotel & Conference Center
2801 Plank Rd.
Fredericksburg, VA22401

To make hotel reservations, please call: 540-786-8321, or Book your room online!

Room rates are $79 per night plus applicable taxes for Single, Double, Triple, or Quad occupancy. Reservations must be made by 5 PM on Friday, October 26, 2018. When you call the hotel, make sure to tell them that you are attending the convention so that you will receive the special convention rate. For anyone seeking to spend extra time exploring Historical Fredericksburg, the rate is good three days before and three days after the event. Individual reservations will not be guaranteed without first night’s deposit or credit card.

Please Note: The group rate is the best rate. Government and military discounts do not apply. For the rate to be honored, please contact the property directly. Do not use a travel site for booking.

Future Conventions

I know, we’re not even out with this year’s state convention agenda. Yet at our August board meeting we took the opportunity to announce the location of future conventions. We plan far in advance in order to identify and seize the best rates at some of the better properties.

In 2019 we will be hosting the state convention at the Renaissance in Portsmouth.

In 2020 and 2022 we will be rejoining our friends at the Westin in Tysons Corner. Hotel rates are steadily increasing, and so we took advantage of a multiyear agreement to keep the rates below $90.

We have temporarily tabled discussion on 2021. Part of our site selection will depend on local chapter development.

With the convention being held in Northern Virginia as often, we will need to revisit the way host chapters shoulder the financial burden of providing hospitality. At our August board meeting a proposal was raised that would have asked each chapter to contribute a set amount to ease the load on the local organizations. The proposal failed on a tie. If you have ideas on minimizing the cost for hospitality, please talk to Tracy or bring them for discussion in November.

Sponsorships and Exhibits

Following closely on the heels of that last point is the matter of sponsorships. If we create a robust enough program, we will be able to minimize the financial burden on our affiliate and chapter treasuries. Please, if you have any contacts at companies with an interest in investing in our programming, Annette Carr needs to be introduced to them. If you need talking points or ideas on how to approach businesses, please let us know.

Learn more about our Sponsorships and Exhibits program, and help us cultivate new partners in our shared mission to help the blind of Virginia.


Northern Virginia Bus for the 2018 State Convention
By John Halverson, President, Potomac Chapter

The National Federation of the Blind 2018 state convention is rapidly approaching. It will be held in Fredericksburg Virginia from November 9-11. It has been suggested that we arrange a bus to go from Northern Virginia to Fredericksburg and to return to northern Virginia at the conclusion of the convention.

During week days there are many opportunities to take either Amtrak or the Virginia Railway Express (VRE) from DC, Arlington or Alexandria to the convention. However on Sunday, November 11, after the convention concludes, Amtrak is limited to an early evening train and the VRE does not run.

Please let me know by October 1 if you are interested in sharing the cost of a bus.

There are three options:

  1. No bus.
  2. A bus going both ways.
  3. A bus returning to northern Virginia on Sunday, November 11.

If we do not get a strong response, we can only assume that people are not interested in a bus either way. We speculate that the Sunday North bound bus is viable but we need you to contact me to let me know you are interested.

John Halverson
703 379-1141
jwh100@outlook.com


Project RISE is Now Available Statewide

We are excited to announce that Project RISE (Resilience, Independence, Self-Advocacy, and Employment), our program for transition age youth ages 14 to 21 will be starting it’s second year in September and is now offering programming state wide.

Please note that the deadline to participate in the Project RISE programming at convention in November is September 20. If you have any questions, please email nfbprojectrise@gmail.com or call (203) 273-8463. You can also visit the Project RISE website at rise.nfbv.org.

Resilience | Independence | Self-Advocacy | Employment

Blind students ages 14-21 throughout the entire state ofVirginia will have the chance to interact with and form lasting relationships with young successful blind professionals, who have overcome many of the obstacles placed before blind students and now are eager to teach their younger peers how to conquer life.

The statewide program will meet four times throughout2018-2019. Students will have the opportunity to further develop skills such as travel, home management, and technology through interactive and hands on workshops and community activities.

Through mentorship and a positive environment, students of all ages will learn how to communicate effectively with teachers and employers to ensure they receive the tools they need to succeed in school, and the work place.

Students will share their educational and career goals andProject RISE will help them reach those goals through, resume and interview workshops, and placement in summer internships or jobs that interest them. Join us in this journey toward independence, confidence, and success! Blindness will never hold you back.

For any questions or to secure your spot Email: nfbprojectrise@gmail.com, Visit rise.nfbv.org, or call: (203) 273-8463.


How to be More Popular
By John Bailey, President, Fairfax Chapter

I was honored to be a part of the South Eastern Division weekend held at our National Center in Baltimore in early August. It was great to catch up with old friends and make lots of new ones.

One of the activities during the weekend I particularly found interesting was the breakout session where the students talked about the challenges they were facing and the ensuing conversations about how to resolve them.

One particular conversation that really caught my attention was where a student shared how hard it was to make friends and how challenging it was to get more socially active. This desire was shared by lots of their peers.

The problem sounded very familiar because this was the same challenge I had growing up vision impaired. It was tough being a part of the sighted community because you were not like them And, I didn’t know anyone else who was blind. It felt pretty lonely at times.

That all changed when I entered college. I met up with fellow students who really seemed to have it all together. They were interesting, popular, and were always being invited to parties and other social events. Two of them were my roommates and they were the Student President and Vice President. By watching them and following their examples, I was soon able to greatly improved my social situation.

The people I emulated were masters at being popular and here are the five actions they took that made them be people you wanted to hang out with.

Act Confident.

I have heard the phrase, “Confidence is sexy” many times and it is true. Even if you don’t look like a movie star or wear the latest clothes, being confident overcomes all that and more. But, how do you act confident if you don’t feel it? The answer is simple and with practice, people will begin to perceive you as self assured.

I said “act” confident on purpose. The first step in becoming more confident is by pretending you are. Act as if you felt cool calm and collected even if you don’t feel it. This will become easier over time because of all the positive feedback you will be getting from your new friends.

Listen more than talk

Every one wants to feel that they have something to say and you listening to them makes them feel good. And, that is what making friends is all about. When talking to others, spend most of your time listening. People will like you a lot more because you care enough to hear their thoughts.

Give and give some more

Friends help each other. So, don’t be stingy with your assistance. Make an effort to do something nice for every person you meet. Again, if you show interest in them, they will show interest in you.

Be the party!

Don’t wait to be invited to parties, host your own event and invite others. You know how being invited to something makes you feel special. What if you were hosting a party and made others feel special by inviting them. Making others feel special makes you special too.

Remember to smile

Because this is last on the list doesn’t make it any less important. When you smile, others will smile too. There is scientific research that shows that when you smile at someone, a part of their brain fires and they get good feelings about you. Smiling also communicates that you like them. People want to be liked. Smile while you are spending time with people and they will want to spend more time with you.

Wanting to be more socially accepted isn’t just a “blind problem”. It is a part of human nature to be liked and to have lots of friends. The actions I talked about will work for anyone who wants to better connect with others.

The bottom line to making friends is to make them feel special. If you make it a practice to be a better listener, be there if they need help, or just inviting them to an event, you will soon find yourself with lots more friends and much more satisfying relationships.


Quick tips-Making Our Meetings and Workshops More Accessible, Productive, and Fun
By Jeremy Grandstaff, 2nd Vice-president, Greater Alexandria Chapter

At the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia (NFBV,) we have a number of meetings. At chapter meetings for example, we invite people to come to learn about NFBV, engage more effectively in our work, and to learn more about our own abilities to transform our lives to achieve what we want.

This month’s quick tip is about helping us be more intentional and successful with our meetings. Whether a chapter meeting, or committee meeting, or even a conference workshop (just another type of meeting), Here our five quick tips to help us achieve success with our meetings, which will then keep people engaged and coming back from more.

1. Plan the meeting: Identify the overall purpose, the agenda, who we need to target, and information we can send in advance for people to be most prepared. Using a small team to help us answer these questions makes it even better.

2. Have a strong and interactive agenda: Identify the logistics of our meeting, each agenda item, and for each agenda item, determine the purpose of that discussion and any ways that we can get people interacting with each other to achieve that purpose.

3. Send reports in advance and share with attendees: Ask committee chairs to give you brief reports that can be included in the agenda and preparation materials. This allows the meeting to stay focused on questions and dialog, making things more interactive and exciting.

4. Have at least one item each meeting that asks people to dialog with each other: by creating a space for small group discussion, all participants at our meeting or workshop will better process information, engage in the ask, and pay more attention. Having a speaker at an upcoming meeting? Ask them to talk for 10 minutes, break people apart to discuss what they heard, and then hold the Q&A of the speaker (we will notice a difference in the dialog and Q&A).

5. Have a great closing: Leave people with excitement about what’s happening after the meeting and make sure we have asked people to lead action items. Also, ask for some people to check out of the meeting by sharing one thing we are taking away from the discussion. Make it Fun and exciting that we came to your meeting.

At NFBV, it is critical that we bring confidence, excitement, and a collaborative spirit to our work and ensuring we are engaging new members at effective meetings will help us do just this. Here is an additional resource that might help: cheat sheet for effective meetings. We’re always hear to help our leaders succeed, so be sure to let us know how we can help.


Hadley: The Hidden Gem for Blind Entrepreneurs
By Joe Orozco

Reprinted from my personal blog.

After the economic bust in 2008 many people went into business for themselves, and while it is always a good idea to be educated on the nuances of planning and launching a new business, you don’t necessarily need a full college degree.

These days online education is nothing unique. Anyone can take advantage of sites like Khan Academy and Udemy to take courses in specific topics. In fact, for anyone, blind or sighted, interested in various online learning options, check out this helpful article from The Simple Dollar. For blind computer users, however, it’s nice to count on a service like Hadley you know is always accessible.

If you’re blind, interested in starting a business, and have not given Hadley some thought, it’s time to reconsider it.

From their website:

Founded in 1920 by William Hadley and Dr. E.V.L. Brown, Hadley offers courses free of charge to its blind and visually impaired students and their families and affordable tuition to blindness professionals. Today, Hadley is the largest provider of distance education for people who are blind or visually impaired around the world, serving more than 10,000 students annually in all 50 states and 100 countries. Hadley is also the largest educator of braille worldwide. A 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, the school relies on contributions from individuals, foundations and corporations to fund its programs.

I want to turn your attention to Hadley’s Forsythe Center for Employment and Entrepreneurship. The curriculum is broken into modules with specific concentrations ranging from social security, tax and accounting to legal, marketing, management and communications. While I have not seen any prerequisite requirements, I myself began, and would strongly recommend, the Self-employment with a Minimal Investment course as a starting point, because it provides a great panoramic picture of planning a business strategy.

Among other online courses, they offer:

  • Accounting for Small Business
  • Business Communications
  • Business Ethics
  • Business Fundamentals
  • Business Insurance
  • Business Law 1
  • Business Law 2
  • Business Writing
  • Market Research
  • Marketing: Conveying a Message

The online courses are all fully accessible with screen readers. It’s possible to stop and come back to your previous place in a module. The exams are laid out in a straightforward manner, and when you’re asked to submit assignments from your computer, the instructions are straightforward.

In fact, I’ve been pleasantly surprised with my Hadley experience. For no good reason, a dim part of me figured the courses were either too basic to be of any value or the instructors would be average at best. On the contrary, the class material has always been of solid caliber. The exams are well-balanced, and the instructors have always shown a firm handle of their subject. Without exception, they have been very responsive to e-mails and phone calls.

If anything, I sometimes wonder if Hadley is selling itself short. I take courses around my busy work schedule. If I had to pay a tuition fee, even a nominal amount, I might take my pace a little more seriously. The quality of instruction is so solid that you wonder if there’s a catch.

From the novice entrepreneur to the veteran, I think there’s plenty to be taken away from Hadley’s business-oriented adult learning curriculum. It proved beneficial in helping me draft a marketing strategy and revamp my overall business plan for my freelance business. I wish they would advertise their services a little better. I might very well be living under a rock, but I think Hadley could be making the mistake that blind people everywhere know it exists and what it offers.

If you’ve been talking about starting a full or part-time business but never got around to planning it; Hadley’s courses are an excellent means of taking that first crucial step.


Chapter and Division Announcements

Peninsula Chapter Annual Cookout

From Tasha Hubbard:

Hey there! Hi There! Ho There!

I know where I’ll be on 9 15 guess where?

At the annual cookout hosted by the Peninsula chapter

Full of fun, games, music and much laughter

Come from far and wide to join the celebration

Don’t you want to come help build the federation

So, aren’t you glad you asked?

Now, I’ll leave you with one small task….

Hmm What’s it going to be?

Just to please RSVP

And if you can’t make this particular celebration

No worries, we’ll gladly accept donations

When: September 15, 2018

Time: 1:00-5:00(or until you get tired)

Where: Deer Park Shelter 1 11523 Jefferson Ave. Newport News, VA

Cost: $10

Please RSVP by September 8, 2018 via email to: uricka.harrison@icloud.com.

Please send donations to Care of Nathan Branch

NFBV Peninsula Chapter
316 NanTucket Place Newport News, VA 23603

Walkathon in Colonial Williamsburg

From Corlis Jones, President, Greater Williamsburg Chapter

Walk With the Blind!

Join members of the Rivers and Bay chapters of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia as we walk through Historic Colonial Williamsburg. Support us as we raise awareness of what blind people can achieve.

When: Saturday, October 13, 2018

9:00 AM: Registration Opens

10:00 AM: Kick Off

Where: Starting at the Capital Building (end of Duke of Gloucester St.), Colonial Williamsburg

Registration: $15

Sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay, Greater Williamsburg, Peninsula, and Tidewater Chapters of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia

“Living the Lives We want”

For more information, contact: Corlis Jones at phone: 757-565-1185, email: cmjones153@cox.net . Please make checks payable to NFBV and send them to: Carroll Bailey, 4700 Newport Forrest, Williamsburg, VA 23188

VABS Bowl with the Blind

From Robert Parsons, President, Virginia Association of Blind Students

Greetings Students and Virginia Federationists

With the fall season swiftly approaching, the season of advocacy is upon us once again. Yes, the month in which the nation’s blind raise awareness of our effectiveness and presence in local and national communities is finally returning. October is national meet the blind month and like our fellow affiliates, the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia is hard at work in preparing their local events to marry awareness and camaraderie between chapters, friends, and family. Last year, the Virginia Association of Blind Students executed their first meet the blind month activity with “Bowl with the Blind, “to overwhelming success and support. As a sign of future great annual events to come, VABS will be returning with this annual culminating event. The details are below:

Title: VABS “Bowl with the Blind.”

Date: Saturday, October 6, 2018

Time: 1pm-4pm

Price: $10 (Covers Three Games and Shoe Rental)

Where: Pin Boys at the Beach
1577 Laskin Rd.
Virginia Beach, VA 23451

Stay tuned for ride share and car pool opportunities from Northern Virginia and Richmond. This year, VABS will be raffling a Google Home Mini during the event. Ticket prices for the prize will be $1 or five tickets for $3. If you would like to register for this event, please contact Robert Parsons at 804.801.7674 or rob.parso3389@gmail.com . I look forward to connecting with all of you in October.


NFB Pledge

I pledge to participate actively in the effort of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its constitution.

The Vigilant: May 2018

The Vigilant: May 2018

Joe Orozco, Editor

From the President’s Desk

In the past month, I was reminded about how much I love our Federation family. As many of you know, my wife’s father, Dr. Leonard Appel passed away on April 21. The outpouring of love and support to Sharon and we have been tremendous and I am grateful for the kindness and friendship in our Federation family. While we work together to accomplish great things, we are also there for each other.

Project RISE:

On Saturday, May 12, we held another great event where students learned new skills and expanded their capabilities through a transit and travel adventure. In addition to our project RISE team, we had talented volunteers assist including Conchita Hernandez, Maurice Peret, and Ollie cantos. Now, we are ramping up for a weekend long event at the NFB Jernigan Institute in June.

Code of Conduct:

Over the past month, I have had the pleasure to visit with members of the Peninsula, Tidewater and Greater Alexandria chapters. These meetings have been fun and enlightening. I am grateful to the hospitality and warmth from our chapter members and truly enjoy visiting with you. One topic of conversation was the code of Conduct. People ask how to sign.

To sign the Code of Conduct, simply send Tracy an email message with Section XI of the code of conduct in the body of the message. Where is says federation Leader, replace that text with your first and last name. The Code of Conduct can be found in the March Vigilant.

If people don’t have access to email or have other challenges, we will have some paper copies at the May 19 Board of Directors meeting

My target is to get signed copies from all affiliate elected officers, all chapter officers, and all division officers before the convention in July.

Visiting Chapters:

On April 19, I attended the Greater Alexandria Chapter’s first birthday party. This chapter holds a very engaging and interactive meeting and it was a blast. On May 12, I enjoyed attending a joint meeting of the Tidewater and Peninsula Chapters in Norfolk. I hope to visit more chapters in the coming months so feel free to let me know what you are doing and how I can help.

National Scholarship Finalists

Please join me in congratulating our two scholarship finalists Naim Abu-El Hawa and Sarah Patnaude.

Sarah, as you might recall, was elected to our affiliate board at last year’s convention. She recently finished her first year of graduate school at George Mason University. After graduating with her Master’s in Social Work, Sarah plans on becoming a victim advocate, where she hopes to help survivors of trauma regain their voice and take control of the steering wheel in their life. Beyond school and her work with the NFB, Sarah enjoys travelling and has a love for musicals. As a tenBroek Fellow this year, she looks forward to continuing to learn from Federationists across the country and using the knowledge and experiences she gains to strengthen the movement.

Naim is also very active in our affiliate. He is the vice-president of the Virginia Association of Blind Students and holds a board position in our Potomac Chapter.

These students will be with us at our national convention and I am thrilled to be cheering for them at the banquet.

National Convention

Our National Convention is fast approaching. In the April newsletter, we provided details about our responsibilities this year as one of the host affiliates. Shortly, we will provide details on how to sign up for a shift at the Virginia Table, the Welcome Table, the Hospitality Suite, or working at the Friday night Welcome Party. Additionally, we will need people to mentor first time convention attendees through the McDonald fellowship program and the Jernigan Convention Scholarship program. As you know, the convention only works when many volunteers step up to help. Please make time to assist us by taking a shift for these responsibilities. I look forward to working together with you at convention.

Yours in Service,

Tracy Soforenko
President, National Federation of the Blind of Virginia


This Month’s Words of Inspiration

“You can buy food, but not appetite; medicine but not health; knowledge but not wisdom; glitter, but not beauty; fun, but not joy; acquaintances, but not friends; servants, but not faithfulness; leisure, but not peace. You can have the husk of everything for money, but not the kernel.” — Arne Garborg


Ten Tips for a Resume that Gets You the Interview
By John Bailey

Project RISE is possible thanks in large part to the efforts of the volunteers who make each session come alive. John Bailey, president of the Fairfax Chapter, recently met with our students to discuss, among other employment tasks, drafting compelling resumes. Here are the tips he shared with the students, which you yourself might benefit from when you are ready to start searching for your first job or land that next position.

Let’s face it, the whole goal from searching online for a job, creating that perfect resume, talking to your career buddies about unadvertised job opportunities is to get you an interview. Getting face-to-face with your potential employer means that you are almost there in terms of getting the job you want. Once in the interview, you can let your skills, knowledge, and personality take over to dazzle so that you will get the offer. Once in the interview, you have all the power.

But, how do you get invited to that all-important interview? A lot of groundwork must happen first and one of the most important components of that work is having a resume that conveys just enough information about your abilities and professionalism to get hiring managers to want to see you in person.

I have been reviewing resumes from job seekers for over 20 years and they have varied greatly in their quality. From my experience, below are 10 of the easiest ways to supercharge your resume so that it is put into the ‘interview’ pile instead of the recycle bin.

1. Avoid typos and grammatical errors at all costs!

Would you go to a job interview with a blaring stain on your clothing? Of course not. So, why wouldn’t you take the same amount of care that you put into your clothing than you do in crafting an effective resume?

The unpleasant truth is, in the initial review of your resume, people are looking for reasons not to read it. And, grammatical errors can get your resume tossed quicker than any other reason. Take the time to review your resume for spelling and grammar mistakes. Then, have a friend you trust review it again.

2. Highlight Achievements rather than duties

It is all too easy to just copy your list of current duties and put them down in your resume. Employers really don’t care about what you did in your last job. They want to know what value you can bring to their organization if they hire you. In order to convey this effectively, rewrite your activities in terms of how you made things better (added value) at your last job. A great way to do this is to state how you made things better by quantifying the results. Ideally, use specific numbers. For example, ‘Oversaw training program for over a dozen employees increasing retention by 20 percent.”

Turning duties into accomplishments is just a matter of looking at things a little differently.

3. Write for the job you are applying for

As mentioned earlier, during the initial review of your resume, staff is looking for reasons to toss it in order to get through as many resumes as possible. To make your resume stand out as one that should be read completely, you should customize your resume so that they will want to read it. You accomplish this by ‘echoing’ back the keywords, skill sets, and terms used in the original job posting. Give them what they are looking for and make it easy to find!

4. Give them just enough information in your resume to get them to want to know more

Again, the goal of a well-crafted resume should be to get you the interview. You should just include enough information to whet the curiosity of the hiring manager to want to talk to you further. Save your life’s story for the novel.

6. Write a summary that allows you to shine

Unfortunately, resume summaries are one of the last parts of the resume to be written and the most neglected. Employers do read your career summary looking for the values and attitudes that would make you a good fit for their organization. Don’t skimp on this opportunity to shine. Put down your goals and how they will benefit the organization that hires you. A resume is a beauty contest and you should look your best at every opportunity.

7. Convey accomplishments by using action verbs

Telling a potential employer, you were ‘responsible’ for a duty bores them to tears. Expand on terms like responsible with action verbs like, organized, implemented, oversaw, enhanced, etc. Again, it is all about what value you can bring to the hiring organization.

8. Even volunteers have value

Here is a great tip for new job seekers who feel their resume is a bit short on accomplishments. Every resume should include some references to unpaid employment. A skill is a skill whether or not you receive monetary compensation for it.

9. Keep your resume easy to read

People who read resumes for a living have a hard-enough job. Make it easy for them to find the information they are looking for by using lots of white space, using bold or highlighted text to emphasize important terms or skills that the employer might be looking for, use a minimum of fonts, and most importantly, use a font size that is easy on the eyes.

10. Continue updating your resume even if you aren’t looking for a new job

Leaving all the great things you have accomplished to memory is a receipt for disaster. You will forget. So, continually update your resume with newly acquired skills and talents so that when it does come time for a job move, you won’t be scratching your head trying to remember what you did last year.

In conclusion, resumes are the key for unlocking doors to interviews. Your resume should scream value, competence, and professionalism. Just a bit of extra work on your resume can make a world of difference in getting that dream interview.


Join the NFB of Virginia team for Braille Literacy

The following is from President Soforenko. Please take note of the deadline noted below. Our sincere apologies for running this issue so late in the month, but hopefully some of you will still find the means to participate in this worthwhile activity.

Join Federationists and friends from across the Mid Atlantic for a fun 6K Run / Walk at the NFB Six Dot Dash in Baltimore.

While some of us will be running, many including myself will probably walk.

On Sunday, June 3, the National Federation of the Blind Six Dot Dash will begin at 8:00 AM on the streets of Federal Hill in Baltimore.

We have established an NFB of Virginia team (called Virginia Federationists) and you could join us to help us field the largest team at this year’s event. There will be members from Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia and hopefully other affiliates across the Mid Atlantic.

Some of us will be going up Saturday evening, June 2 and staying at the NFB National Center. If you are interested in joining the NFB of Virginia team, please email me by Sunday, May 20. This is especially important for those hoping to stay at the NFB National Center. President Riccobono has generously offered to let us stay at the national Center but there will be no food provided by the center and we will need to provide a set of individuals who will be staying shortly after May 20.

Please know that you are responsible for the $39 online pre-registration fee ($40 on race day) and costs for transportation and a Saturday evening meal at a restaurant in Baltimore. There will not be a cost for our stay at the NFB National Center’s conference center. We will bring up a simple breakfast of bagels and orange juice for Sunday morning.

Click here for more details on the Six Dot Dash, go to the below web link:

Click here to register.

I found the Event Bright web site to be frustrating with a screen reader but I eventually muddled through it. Our team is called Virginia Federationists.

I hope you can join us for this fun morning with Federationists and friends from across the Mid Atlantic.


Nonprofit Development: Grant Writing 101
By Joe Orozco

In the coming years our affiliate will implement a diverse fundraising strategy to make it possible for us to have more services like Project RISE. One of those funding strategies will likely be grant writing, and while grant writing will make the most sense at the affiliate level, where we can project the greatest impacts, that does not mean chapters and divisions cannot pursue their own grant writing strategies to help fund activities they would like to sponsor. Here’s a starting point to thinking about grant writing.

Do you want to know the top three reasons grant seekers fail to land an award? First, the applicant’s work does not match the funder’s priorities. Second, the applicant does not follow directions about when and how to submit a proposal, and third, the applicant fails to communicate with the funder before and after the application process.

The reasons for these mistakes are as diverse as the organizations that make them. Based on my professional experience, here are a few guesses why the mistakes persist:

  • Why pay a professional when we can just use community volunteers?
  • We just got a sizable grant from a well-known foundation that will surely give us credibility.
  • If we apply to 100 opportunities, someone is bound to give us money!
  • We can’t meet all the application guidelines but meet enough of them that we may as well try.
  • We’re doing such great work that funders would be stupid, heartless and insensitive not to pick us.
  • We’ve got the grant, so why should we keep communicating with the funder?

Grant writing is not exact science. Only scammers can promise you a near 100% success rate, but that doesn’t mean you can’t increase your likelihood of attracting lucrative grant awards.

Before you apply for a grant, consider these basic questions:

  • Does the funder sponsor work in your city and state?
  • Does your mission statement neatly fit into one of the funder’s program areas?
  • Will the grant fund an existing program, or will you need to create a new one?
  • Does the deadline give you enough time to gather all your materials and prepare the proposal?
  • If you were sitting on the other side of the table, would you be eager to select your own application?

Cultivating a healthy grant portfolio is difficult but not impossible. If you want to tackle it yourself, you’ll be far ahead of the curve if you avoid the common pitfalls that put so many grant seekers in the recycle bin.


The Parsons Report

Robert Parsons is involved in all kinds of tasks and projects in the affiliate. Here are a couple of his recent undertakings, and because we were late in putting out this issue, we were unable to properly announce the fact the student division provided lunch at the most recent affiliate board meeting. But thank you to Robert and his teams for all they do for Virginia.

VABS:

The Virginia Student Division is, as usual, hard at work at promoting the continued message of the Federation that our future leaders are cultivated through community, regional, and national efforts of advocacy and confidence building.

VABS will have a full presence at the National Convention, where we will continue our fundraising efforts. VABS will be raffling off Uber, Lift, and Amazon gift cards for the entirety of the week, with a winning ticket being drawn every two days.

Finally, from August 10-12, the Virginia Association of Blind Students will be participating in the NFB Southeastern Student Seminar. This weekend event will see the combined advocacy, confidence building, and leadership skills of national and state leaders disseminated to the students of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington D. C.. Any students interested in joining VABS or attending any of these events can contact Robert Parsons, President, at 804,801.7674.

Richmond Chapter:

The Richmond chapter is hard at work at continuing its tradition of being a local and statewide leader in innovative social planning. The annual Richmond chapter spring picnic will take place on Saturday, June 9, 2018 at the Richmond ARC Park, located at 3600 Saunders Avenue, Richmond, VA 23227. For more information, please contact Gerald Meredith, event planner, at 804.243.3980.


NFB Pledge

I pledge to participate actively in the effort of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its constitution.

The Vigilant: March 2018

Joe Orozco, Editor

Special Announcement

The National Federation of the Blind has implemented a Code of Conduct that all members of the National Board of Directors and affiliate presidents have signed. The Virginia affiliate will discuss and officially adopt the Code of Conduct at its state board meeting on Saturday, May 19, 2018. Everyone must read and understand the code of conduct. Acknowledgement of the pledge is required of all affiliate and chapter leaders.

Our affiliate must confirm adoption of this Code of Conduct prior to the national convention. Changes to this document are not permitted without the permission of the NFB National Board. If you have suggestions for future edits to this document, please send them to President Riccobono with a carbon copy to NFB of Virginia President Tracy Soforenko.

Two conference calls have been set up to answer questions of the Code of Conduct. These will be presided over by NFB First Vice President Pam Allen.

Call #1:

Monday, March 19 at 7:00 PM ET

Call #2:

Thursday, March 22 at 8:00 PM ET

Dial: 218-895-6872

Passcode: 2018#

The text of the Code of Conduct follows:


NATIONAL FEDERATION OF THE BLIND OF Virginia
CODE OF CONDUCT

I. Introduction

The National Federation of the Blind of Virginia is part of a nationwide community of members and friends who believe in the hopes and dreams of the nation’s blind. The Federation knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future. Every day we raise the expectations of blind people, because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams. You can live the life you want; blindness is not what holds you back. To help carry out the Federation’s vital mission, this Code of Conduct sets forth policies and standards that all members, especially Federation leaders, are expected to adopt and follow.

II. Diversity Policy

The National Federation of the Blind of Virginia embraces diversity and full participation as core values in its mission to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind. We are committed to building and maintaining a statewide organization with local chapters and divisions that is unified in its priorities and programs and is directed by the membership. We respect differences of opinion, beliefs, identities, and other characteristics that demonstrate that blind people are a diverse cross section of society. Furthermore, the organization is dedicated to continuing to establish new methods of membership and leadership development that reflect the diversity of the entire blind community. In promoting a diverse and growing organization, we expect integrity and honesty in our relationships with each other and openness to learning about and experiencing cultural diversity. We believe that these qualities are crucial to fostering social and intellectual maturity. Intellectual maturity also requires individual struggle with unfamiliar ideas. We recognize that our views and convictions will be challenged, and we expect this challenge to take place in a climate of tolerance and mutual respect in order to maintain a united organization. While we encourage the exchange of differing ideas and experiences, we do not condone the use of demeaning, derogatory, or discriminatory language, action, or any other form of expression intended to marginalize an individual or group. The National Federation of the Blind does not tolerate discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, national origin, citizenship, marital status, age, genetic information, disability, or any other characteristic or intersectionality of characteristics.

III. Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy

The National Federation of the Blind of Virginia will not tolerate discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, national origin, citizenship, marital status, age, genetic information, disability, or any other characteristic or intersectionality of characteristics. Harassment on the basis of any of these characteristics similarly will not be tolerated. Although this Code of Conduct establishes a minimum standard prohibiting discrimination and harassment, nothing in this Code should be interpreted to limit in any way a person’s right to report abuse or harassment to law enforcement when appropriate.
Sexual harassment is prohibited by state and federal law and also will not be tolerated by the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia. Complaints of harassment may be lodged by a female against a male, by a female against a female, by a male against a male, or by a male against a female. Sexual harassment is defined as “unwelcome sexual advances, request for sexual favors, sexually motivated physical contact, or other verbal or physical conduct or communication of a sexual nature.” The following conduct is either considered conduct that by itself is sexual harassment, or that has the potential risk of causing sexual harassment to occur, and this conduct is therefore prohibited:
· unwelcome inappropriate physical contact or touching;
· repeating of sexually suggestive jokes/references/innuendoes and comments about an individual’s body/sexual prowess/physical attributes/dress;
· the use of sexually derogatory language/pictures/videos toward/about another person;
· the use of inappropriate sexual gestures;
· sexually suggestive propositions; and
· explicit or implicit threats that failure to submit will have negative consequences.

Under this policy, harassment can be verbal, written, or physical conduct that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual because of his or her race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, age, disability, marital status, citizenship, genetic information, or any other characteristic protected by law; or that of his or her relatives, friends, or associates, and that a) has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment; b) has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance or involvement in the organization; or c) otherwise adversely affects an individual’s opportunities for participation/advancement in the organization.
Harassing conduct includes epithets, slurs, or negative stereotyping; threatening, intimidating or hostile acts including bullying; denigrating jokes; and written or graphic material that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual or group that is placed on walls or elsewhere on the organization’s premises or circulated by email, phone (including voice messages), text messages, social networking sites, or other means.

IV. Social Media and Web Policy

All members of the Federation, but especially officers and board members of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia as well as those in leadership positions such as chapter and division presidents, should follow these recommended guidelines when making comments online, posting to a blog, using Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn/YouTube/Pinterest/Instagram/similar tools, and/or using other platforms that fall under the definition of social media:
· Promote the mission and branding message of the organization in comments/posts.
· Recognize that you are morally and legally responsible for comments/pictures posted online.
· Be aware that the audience includes members and nonmembers of the NFB, both youth and adults, representing diverse cultures and backgrounds.
· Refrain from using profanity/derogatory language.
· Post/respond with integrity. Though you may disagree with a post, be respectful and factual. Do not fight or air personal grievances online.
· Do not post materials that are inappropriate for children/minors to view/share/read.

V. Conflict of Interest Policy

Each NFB of Virginia officer, board member, or chapter or division president (hereafter Federation leader) is expected to take appropriate responsibility to protect the Federation from misappropriation or mismanagement of Federation funds (including funds of the affiliate, chapter, or division in which the Federation leader assumes a leadership role).
Each Federation leader is expected to disclose the existence of any potentially conflicting personal financial interest or relationship to the full National Federation of the Blind of Virginia Board of Directors and seek its review and approval, as specified below. For example:
· A Federation leader must seek board review and approval of his or her receipt of salary or compensation of any kind from the Federation (including an affiliate, chapter, or division).
· A Federation leader must seek board review and approval of receipt by his or her spouse, parent, child, sibling, or other close relative of salary or compensation of any kind from the Federation (including an affiliate, chapter, or division).
· A Federation leader must seek board review and approval of any ownership interest exceeding 5 percent in or of any salary, compensation, commission, or significant tangible gift from any commercial venture doing business or seeking to do business with the Federation (including an affiliate, chapter, or division). This process will also apply to the review of such interests involving spouses, parents, children, siblings, or other close relatives.
· In reviewing matters brought pursuant to this section, the officer or board member seeking state board review and approval will refrain from voting.
· Each Federation leader shall take appropriate steps to avoid unauthorized or inaccurate appearances or official endorsement by the Federation (including an affiliate, chapter, or division) of any product, service, or activity that has not been so endorsed. For example, because the Federation never endorses political parties or candidates for elected office, any Federation leader participating in the political process must take care to avoid creating an appearance of official Federation endorsement.

VI. Policy While Interacting with Minors

For purposes of this Code of Conduct and consistent with most legal standards, a minor is any individual under the age of eighteen. While interacting with any minor, a state officer, board member, or chapter or division president (hereafter Federation leader) shall recognize that a minor cannot legally give consent for any purpose even if said minor is verbally or otherwise expressing consent. For example, a minor may say that he/ or she consents to physical interaction. However, such consent is not valid or legal and should not be accepted. A parent or guardian must be informed and consulted about any action requiring consent from the minor. A Federation leader shall report any inappropriate interactions between adults and minors to the minor’s parents and law enforcement when appropriate.

VII. Alcohol and Drug Policy

Although alcoholic beverages are served at some Federation social functions, members and Federation leaders may not participate in any such functions in a condition that prevents them from participating safely and from conducting Federation business effectively or that might cause embarrassment to or damage the reputation of the Federation. The Federation prohibits the possession, sale, purchase, delivery, dispensing, use, or transfer of illegal substances on Federation property or at Federation functions.

VIII. Other General Principles

In addition to the other policies and standards set-forth herein, state officers, state board members, and chapter and division presidents (hereafter Federation leaders) shall adhere to the following standards:

· Federation leaders shall practice accountability and transparency in all activities and transactions.
· Federation leaders shall foster a welcoming environment at NFB meetings, events, and conferences that is a cooperative and productive atmosphere for all members and nonmembers.
· Federation leaders shall interact with NFB staff in a professional manner and follow proper channels of authority and communication.
· Federation leaders shall positively promote the NFB through verbal and written communication.
· Whenever possible, Federation leaders and members are strongly encouraged to handle conflicts or complaints involving other members privately, directly, and respectfully. Nothing in this standard is intended to limit a Federation leader’s or member’s right to pursue organizational change through appropriate methods or to limit anyone’s right to file a complaint for violation of this Code when necessary.

IX. Violations and Complaint Procedure

Violations of this Code of Conduct, after first being established through the process set-forth below, are subject to disciplinary action by the Federation. Such disciplinary actions may include but are not limited to counselling, verbal and/or written reprimand, probation, suspension or termination of officer/leadership duties, and/or suspension or expulsion from the Federation.
· Any complaint for a violation of this Code of Conduct shall be filed with the state president. The state president shall appoint a committee of no more than four persons to investigate the complaint and provide a recommendation for action or lack thereof. The committee shall be comprised of persons not directly involved in the matters being raised and who can be completely unbiased about the individuals and issues addressed in the complaint. Every effort shall be made to appoint a committee reflecting the broad diversity of individuals in the Federation. The state president shall inform the national President in a timely fashion of any complaints filed and report on the resolution of such complaints.
· Complaints shall be treated as confidential in order to protect the identity and reputation of the person about whom the complaint is filed and the person filing the complaint.
· All complaints shall be filed as promptly as possible. Except under extreme circumstances, no complaint shall be accepted or investigated after a year from the time of the alleged violation of this Code.
· Complaints that turn out to be false and used for the purpose of harassing, intimidating, or retaliating against someone will be subject to the same kind of disciplinary action enumerated above.
· Any person dissatisfied with the resolution of a complaint may file an appeal with the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia Board of Directors, which may, in its discretion, take such action as it deems necessary. If a person is still dissatisfied, such person may raise the matter to the national board of directors, which may, in its discretion, take whatever action it deems necessary. No national or state board member shall participate in the consideration of an appeal under this Code if such board member is the subject of the complaint or if such board member cannot be completely unbiased, impartial, and fair while considering the matter.

X. Minimum Standard

This Code of Conduct is intended to recite a minimum set of standards expected of Federation members. It sets forth the spirit that the Federation expects of all of its participants toward each other and toward those who work with the Federation at all of its levels. It is intended to be interpreted broadly to instill a respectful, cooperative, and welcoming spirit in members and in the activities of the Federation.

XI. Federation Pledge and Acknowledgement of Code of Conduct

I, (Federation leader), pledge to participate actively in the efforts of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its Constitution. I further acknowledge that I have read this Code of Conduct and that I will follow its policies, standards, and principles.

Note: The Board of Directors of the National Federation of the Blind unanimously adopted this Code of Conduct on January 26, 2018. In adopting this Code, the Board expressed its clear intent that this Code shall be reviewed annually or at any other time as necessary.


From the President’s Desk

Greetings Fellow Virginians!

The National Federation of the Blind of Virginia is hopping in March. Chapters are running great programming, Virginia members are getting excited about our upcoming National Convention, our Project RISE has successfully launched, our 2 BELL academies are engaging parents and students for an exciting Summer, and our Federation spirit is strong.

Project RISE

Later in this newsletter, you will hear about the successful kick off of Project RISE and how you can help. We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) to provide these pre-employment transition services under a vendor agreement signed in February. We are excited about this important partnership with DBVI and appreciate their commitment to serving blind and low vision students.

Braille Readers Are Leaders

We are very pleased to announce the winners from Virginia of the 2017-2018 Nationwide Braille Readers Are Leaders Contest. While the program was sponsored by the NFB of Illinois in partnership with the National Association to Promote the Use of Braille (NAPUB). Altogether eighty-one students from twelve states took part in the contest. From Virginia, 21 students participated in the program which is absolutely remarkable.
Here is a list of the 2017-2018 Nationwide Braille Leaders Are Leaders winners from Virginia.
Grades 2-3
Honorable Mention: Ely Giraldo, Staunton, VA
Grades 9-12
Second Place: Marie Presume, Staunton, VA
Third Place: Kaelyn Kinlaw, Staunton, VA
We are grateful to the program organizers and we are glad so many students from Virginia chose to participate in the program.

National Convention Hosting

The 2018 NFB National Convention will be especially meaningful because Virginia, Iowa and Florida are serving as the hosts of this year’s convention. Plans are coming together and we will need your help.

In particular, while the conventions run from Tuesday, July 3 through late in the evening of Sunday, July 8, we are taking on responsibilities in the very early part of convention. Please plan to come to convention early so we can hold up our responsibilities and share some warm Virginia hospitality.

A) Welcome Table, Monday July 2 – There will be a Welcome Table passing out convention agendas, answering questions, and welcoming people to the Rosen Shingle Creek property. Since this is technically before the official start of convention, we will need some members to choose to come early to staff the table on Monday, July 2. Earl Everett has agreed to coordinate our staffing of the Welcome Table.
B) Hospitality Suite – Every day of the convention, there is a Host Committee Hospitality Suite open from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 PM from July 3 – 5. The suite is open for breakfast and lunch on General Session (July 6-8) days. The Virginia affiliate will be staffing the Host Committee Hospitality Suite on Tuesday July 3 and Friday, July 6. Nancy Yeager has agreed to coordinate our staffing of the hospitality suite.
C) Opening Ceremonies – We are organizing an exciting Opening Ceremonies to kick off the convention. I am taking the lead on Opening Ceremonies for the Virginia Affiliate but I need your ideas and suggestions. Please reach out and share your ideas and suggestions as we work to develop an exciting program to kick off the convention. If you have any connections in Orlando, it would really help.
D) special Events – In some years, the Host committee organizes additional events. Kathryn Webster has agreed to participate in an exploratory committee to determine if there are viable options for special events.

If you have ideas and suggestions or other resources to help us succeed, please reach out to one of us. If you would like to volunteer, we would especially appreciate hearing from you.

2018 McDonald Fellowship Program

The 2018 NFB National Convention is an experience you do not want to miss.
Many of those who have attended our national NFB conventions are amazed at how meeting and interacting with over 3000 other blind and low vision convention attendees has positively changed their lives. They not only learn how the problems of vision loss can be overcome, but also experience the confidence that comes with solutions.

If you have never attended a convention, we offer two programs to assist you in attending the convention and getting the most from the experience.

A) McDonald Fellowship organized by the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia
B) Kenneth Jernigan Scholarship run by the National Federation of the Blind

First time convention attendees are strongly encouraged to apply for both.
Below the description of these two separate programs, you will find details on the process for requesting assistance if this is not your first convention.

McDonald Fellowship from the NFB of Virginia

Robert and Marian McDonald selflessly contributed to our Virginia affiliate to further the progress and better the lives of those who are blind, visually impaired, and low vision in Virginia. In their honor, we recognize the personal benefits that come to people who attend a national convention for the first time. In their memory, the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia (NFBV) continues their legacy of education and empowerment to Virginia’s blind citizens.

We anticipate awarding fellowships to assist each recipient with costs of attending our 2018 NFB National Convention to be held in Orlando, FL, from July 3- July 8. Please note: The banquet ends late in the evening of Sunday, July 8 and fellowship winners are expected to attend the banquet so return travel must occur on Monday, July 9 or later. This event will take place at the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel in Orlando Florida.

The McDonald Fellowship program was established in 1998 to assist those who have never attended a convention of the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) or those who have not attended in many years and wish to come to a convention this year.

Federations are welcome and encouraged to apply for both the Virginia specific McDonald Fellowship and a National Kenneth Jernigan Scholarship.

We will link each of our Fellowship winners with mentors who will assist them in getting the most out of their national convention experience. McDonald Fellowship winners are expected to attend the entire NFB convention and share their experiences by addressing our 2018 NFB of Virginia state convention.

Deadline for applications for the McDonald Fellowship is Sunday, April 15, 2018. Winners will be announced May 15, 2018.

Your application should be in the form of a letter delivered via electronic mail. There is no specific form for the application. Applicants should write a brief letter outlining reasons why they should be considered for a Fellowship and the letter must include:

A) Name, Address, phone and email contact information
B) Chapter or other connection with the affiliate
C) How you will benefit from the experience
D) How you have participated with your chapter or the affiliate in the past year
E) Any other pertinent details

In addition, you are required to contact your Chapter President or an affiliate Board Member for a letter of recommendation. Letters of recommendation are due by Sunday, April 15, 2018.

Applications or questions about the Fellowship program should be sent to:

Mary Durbin, Chairman
McDonald Fellowship Committee
Email: mrdurbin@cox.net
Phone: 757-472-2495

Our committee wants to help you make 2018 the year you attend our national convention. The convention will be even better because you were there.

The Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund by Allen Harris

Allen Harris is the chairman of the Kenneth Jernigan Fund Committee and was one of the people who came up with the idea of honoring our former president and longtime leader by establishing a program to promote attendance at the national convention, where so much inspiration and learning occur. Here is Allen’s announcement about the 2018 Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund Program:
Have you always wanted to attend an NFB annual convention but have not done so because of the lack of funds? The Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund invites you to make an application for a scholarship grant. Perhaps this July you too can be in the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel in Orlando, Florida, enjoying the many pleasures and learning opportunities at the largest and most important yearly convention of blind people in the world.
The three biggest ticket items you need to cover when attending an NFB national convention are the roundtrip transportation, the hotel room for a week, and the food (which tends to be higher priced than at home). We attempt to award additional funds to families, but, whether a family or an individual is granted a scholarship, this fund can only help; it won’t pay all the costs. Last year most of the sixty grants were in the range of $400 to $500 per individual.
We recommend that you find an NFB member as your personal convention mentor, (Virginia will assign one to the Virginia winners) someone who has been to many national conventions and is able to share money-saving tips with you and tips on navigating the extensive agenda in the big hotel. Your mentor will help you get the most out of the amazing experience that is convention week.
Who is eligible?
Active NFB members, blind or sighted, who have not yet attended an NFB national convention because of lack of funding are eligible to apply.

How do I apply for funding assistance?

1. You write a letter giving your contact information, and your local NFB information, your specific amount requested, and then explain why this is a good investment for the NFB. The points to cover are listed below.
2. You contact your state president in person or by phone to request his or her help in obtaining funding. Be sure to tell the president when to expect your request letter by email, and mention the deadline.
3. You (or a friend) send your letter by email to your state president. He or she must add a president’s recommendation and then email both letters directly to the Kenneth Jernigan Convention Scholarship Fund Committee. Your president must forward the two letters no later than April 15.
Your letter to Chairperson Allen Harris must cover these points:
Your full name, and all your telephone numbers and label them-cell phone, home, office, other person (if any).
Your mailing address and, if you have one, your email address.
Your state affiliate and state president; your chapter and chapter president, if you attend a chapter.
Your personal convention mentor, and provide that person’s phone number.
Your specific request:
Explain how much money you need from this fund to make this trip possible for you. We suggest you consult with other members to make a rough budget for yourself.
The body of your letter should answer these questions:
How do you currently participate in the Federation? Why do you want to attend a national convention? What would you receive; what can you share or give? You can include in your letter to the committee any special circumstances you hope they will take into consideration.

When will I be notified that I am a winner?

If you are chosen to receive this scholarship, you will receive a letter with convention details that should answer most of your questions. The committee makes every effort to notify scholarship winners by May 15, but you must do several things before that to be prepared to attend if you are chosen.
1. Make your own hotel reservation. If something prevents you from attending, you can cancel the reservation. (Yes, you may arrange for roommates of your own to reduce the cost.) 2. Register online for the entire convention, including the banquet, by May 31.
2. Find someone in your chapter or affiliate who has been to many conventions and can answer your questions as a friend and advisor.
3. If you do not hear from the committee by May 15, then you did not win a grant this year.

How will I receive my convention scholarship?

At convention you will be given a debit card or credit card loaded with the amount of your award. The times and locations to pick up your card will be listed in the letter we sent you. The committee is not able to provide funds before the convention, so work with your chapter and state affiliate to assist you by obtaining an agreement to advance funds if you win a scholarship and to pay your treasury back after you receive your debit or credit card.

What if I have more questions?

For additional information email the chairman, Allen Harris, at kjscholarships@nfb.org, or call his Baltimore, Maryland, office at (410) 659-9314, extension 2415.

Above all, please use this opportunity to attend your first convention on the national level and join several thousand active Federations in the most important meeting of the blind in the world. We hope to see you in Orlando.

Financial Assistance to attend the 2018 National Convention

Our National convention is a highlight for the year and the 2018 convention will be especially remarkable because Virginia is part of the convention host committee. The convention will begin Tuesday, July 3 and end late after the banquet on Sunday evening, July 8. Most people will be departing on Monday, July 9.

We want everyone to plan this into your calendar and your budget so you can be there to join us.

If you are a first-time attendee, we strongly encourage people to apply to both the McDonald Fellowship and Kenneth Jernigan convention Scholarship programs which target first time convention attendees.

Every year, the affiliate president will receive a few requests for convention assistance from affiliate members. I am putting some ground rules in place to help clarify expectations.
If you are planning to request assistance, please send your request to me in email. Your request should factor in the following:
A) What are my total expected costs:
What should I expect to pay for convention factoring in expected costs for travel, lodging, meals, and a banquet ticket and convention registration? I have no idea how much it costs to get from your home to the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando. You need to do the research. In addition, the banquet is a highlight of the convention and you don’t want to miss it. Many people choose to share rooms and you will start seeing roommate requests posted to us announce list starting soon.

B) What can I afford myself?

No one will be going to convention for free. The Jernigan Scholarships and McDonald Fellowships do not provide all the funding for convention for first timers. Individuals requesting financial assistance should expect to make a significant contribution to your convention expenses. You should be factoring in this expense into your budget.

C) What is my chapter contributing?

Your chapter is a resource for financial assistance. Do not come to the Virginia Affiliate requesting financial assistance if you have not asked your local chapter. I will be following up with chapter presidents to understand how you are contributing at the chapter level to programming and fundraising.
D) How much are you requesting from the affiliate

After considering other sources, how much are you requesting from the Virginia affiliate. Please note that we do not provide funding in advance. Mark Roane will provide funding at convention but you need to work locally to get your travel and room expenses addressed. You should definitely expect to attend the Virginia Caucus, probably Wednesday evening, July 4 at 10:00 PM to receive the financial assistance. It is not Mark’s job to hunt you down at convention and it is not Mark’s job to provide you funds as you walk into the hotel. However, Mark will gladly sell you some Virginia Peanuts.

Speaking of selling, fundraising is the means through which we have the resources to provide financial assistance. When I talk to your chapter president, I am checking to determine if you are engaged in the chapter and affiliate fundraising. We will certainly be selling items at the Virginia table at convention and you will be expected to help with that activity if you receive financial assistance. You should also plan to participate in working the Hospitality Suite and other responsibilities as we host the convention. You should be hustling throughout convention and afterward back in Virginia to sell our products to fund our movement.

We are asking that requests are submitted no later than June 1, 2018. You should be planning in advance, booking your hotel room and taking advantage of the early registration pricing.

We want everyone to join us in Orlando and we hope this guidance clarifies the process. However, if you have questions, I am glad to address them.

Whew! That was quite a mouthful of a report! But, I want you to be informed, and most importantly, I want you to be involved. Please tell me if there is anything you need to make that happen.

Yours in service,

Tracy Soforenko, President
National Federation of the Blind of Virginia


This Month’s Words of Inspiration

From the March Braille Monitor:

“At times, when I am asked questions that are born of doubt, I feel like it is definitely not the cat’s meow. However I also realize that these are opportunities to stop and educate someone. For them to go uneducated about what a blind person can do would definitely not be the cat’s meow. But when they discover how I live the life I want with my cats, then it is—yes—the cat’s meow!”–Lauren Merryfield

You may read the article in its entirety here:

https://nfb.org/images/nfb/publications/bm/bm18/bm1803/bm180316.htm


Return of the BELL Program

What is the NFB BELL Program?

The NFB Braille Enrichment for Literacy and Learning (BELL) program provides children, ages 4 through 14, with two weeks of concentrated Braille instruction through fun, hands-on learning. This program is for all blind children who could benefit from Braille enrichment over the summer. This includes children with low-vision, children who have recently lost their vision, children who have been blind since birth, and children who have additional disabilities in addition to blindness/ low-vision.

The National Federation of the Blind will hold two BELL Programs in Virginia in Summer 2018:

Harrisonburg, June 18-29
Contact-Beth Sellers – bsellers31@gmail.com

Arlington, July 16-27
Contact-Nancy Yeager – brlteacher13@gmail.com

Both programs are designed to run Monday through Friday for approximately seven hours each day. In addition to Braille instruction, projects, games, and other engaging activities, children may also enjoy field trips to local attractions.

For a peek at the 2017 Northern Virginia BELL Program, go to:

For more information, go to:

https://nfb.org/bell-academy-faqs-affiliate/va

To apply for either of the Virginia BELL Programs go to:

www.nfb.org/bell-student-application-form

The NFB BELL program has grown exponentially since its inception in 2008. Beginning as one site in the state of Maryland, the program is now offered in numerous states around the country! The NFB BELL program uses time-tested lessons and proven techniques to build self-confidence, positive attitudes, and skills in blind children; characteristics that are essential to ensuring blind children can live the lives that they want now and in the future.

What parents are saying:

“Besides Braille exposure, the most valuable thing my child gained at the NFB BELL program is increased confidence. I can’t believe the change in her attitude and initiative since attending the program.” “This was the most positive program/experience we have ever been involved in. This program was an incredible resource for us both.” “The NFB BELL program changed our lives this year. My daughter learned more in two weeks at NFB BELL than she did in a two- month program last summer!”


Taking on Transition Programming in Northern Virginia
By Arielle Silverman

On Saturday February 17, 2018, the NFBV kicked off Project RISE (Resilience, Independence, Self-advocacy, Employment) with a bang. We had nearly 20 students join us at the Lyon Village Community House in Arlington. After starting with some icebreaker conversations, the students prepared a three-course lunch for the group. Several students learned to cut vegetables, cook pasta and meat sauce, and bake cookies for the very first time. The students worked under the tutelage of our dedicated blind mentors: Marc Canamaso, Susie D’Mello, Derek Manners, Sarah Patnaude, and Evelyn Valdez. While the students were learning nonvisual cooking skills, their parents had a workshop of their own, where they discussed expectations, fears, and questions about blindness with successful blind adults and learned about nonvisual cooking and cane travel techniques.

After lunch, the students engaged in a philosophy discussion with NFBV past president, Dr. Fred Schroeder, as they learned about self-advocacy and positive attitudes surrounding blindness. Students shared their personal experiences and discussed difficult questions, such as how to cope with not getting accessible materials in school, and when a student with low vision should tell an employer about blindness. During the conversation, the older students readily shared their experiences and advice with the younger ones, while Dr. Schroeder emphasized the value of networking to “keep reminding you that what you want to do is possible.”

Over the next four months, our Project RISE students will be meeting one Saturday each month to explore career and college options, practice nonvisual skills, and continue building connections with their mentors and peers. Highlights include a tour of George Mason University in March; a visit to the Apple Store in April; a trip to Pentagon Center Mall in May; and we will culminate with an exciting weekend seminar at the NFB National Center in Baltimore in June. Over the summer, students will be individually connected with opportunities for work experience, job shadowing, or further training in blindness skills.

None of this would be possible without the support of our NFBV family. We are extraordinarily appreciative of our volunteers, mentors, membership, and affiliate leadership. In order to build our program, we need your input and experience. Please join us at an upcoming RISE session! To learn more, visit our web site!


The Wine Report
By John Halverson

The Potomac chapter of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia held one of its two major fundraisers on Saturday March 3.

More than 20 members and friends gathered at Bistro 360 in Arlington Virginia for our annual wine tasting fundraiser.
This year the theme was wines from Spain. Each participant was served four different wines accompanied by Spanish cheeses, crackers, and sausage. A representative of a major distributer of Spanish wines gave a description of each wine and its accompaniments.

After the wine tasting most everyone remained for dinner and to purchase wine. The Bistro graciously offered a 15% contribution to our chapter from all dinner and wine sales.

Finally, they offered us a $100 gift basket to raffle. We charged $5 per ticket and raised $300 on this basket. Needless to say, I was pleased that Sandy Halverson won the prize.

I want to particularly thank Robert Parsons, President of our Richmond Chapter, and his sister Robin for braving the windstorm and slow trains to join us.

Everyone agreed the day was a financial success and a wonderful opportunity for good friends to enjoy fellowship.


Aira & job seeking, a winning combination!

Are you looking for a job, a promotion or career change? Are you finding that various components of these processes are not fully accessible? Would you find it helpful if you had sighted assistance at the moment you were faced with a barrier to landing that dream job? If you have answered yes to any of these questions, then you will want to look into the new employment initiative from Aira.

Aira uses a combination of an iPhone and video streaming technology to provide sighted assistance at the touch of a button from 7:00am – 1:00am EST. There are countless visual tasks the trained Aira live agent can assist you with. Those who use the Aira services are called Aira Explorers and have used the service to Explore New Neighborhoods, complete tasks around the Home, Try New Restaurants, Read a Book or other documents,
Attend Social Events
Go Hiking or for a run and much more.

The latest announcement from Aira is their Employment Assistance program. “Starting on Tuesday, February 20, Aira is offering free service for job-seekers as they navigate employment sites, fill out applications, build resumes, and travel to and from meetings with prospective employers. Through the Aira Employment Program, the first 100 Aira Explorers to secure job interviews will have their ride covered via our partnership with Lyft.”

For more information about the Aira Employment program visit:

http://go.aira.io/employment

For information on Aira’s services and to learn about becoming an Aira Explorer, full details can be found at:

www.aira.io

The company can also be contacted by phone at 858.876.2472 (Pacific Standard Time


Applications for 2018 Roeder Scholarship Now Available

Kathy Gallagher, Learning and Development Manager, NIB
703-310-0343 or kgallagher@nib.org
Applications for the 2018 Joseph Roeder Scholarship are now available on the NIB website. The scholarship provides a one-time award of $2,500 for an undergraduate or graduate student who is legally blind to pursue a college degree in a business-related field.

The scholarship is named for Joe Roeder, senior accessible technology specialist at NIB from 1997 until his death in 2010. Roeder was instrumental in development of the Section 508 electronic and information technology accessibility standards of the Rehabilitation Act, which require all federal government agencies to provide accessible data and information for employees with disabilities.

Paste the following link into your browser for the Joseph Roeder Scholarship application:

http://www.nib.org/content/roeder-scholarship-application

Materials must be submitted online no later than Friday, May 11, 2018. The winner will be announced in June.


NFB Pledge

I pledge to participate actively in the effort of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its constitution.

Walk with the Blind

Join members of the Rivers and Bay chapters of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia as we walk through Historic Colonial Williamsburg. Support us as we raise awareness of what blind people can achieve.

  • When: Saturday, October 14, 2017
  • 9:00 AM: Registration Opens
  • 10:00 AM: Kick Off
  • Where: Starting at the Capital Building (end of Duke of Gloucester St.), Colonial Williamsburg
  • Registration: $15

Sponsored by the following Chapters of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia “Living the Lives We want”:

  • Chesapeake Bay,
  • Eastern Shore,
  • Greater Williamsburg,
  • Peninsula, and
  • Tidewater

For more information, contact:

  • Corlis Jones
  • Phone: (757) 565-1185
  • Email: cmjones153@cox.net

If joining us, please fill out the following Registration form.

Link here for registration and pledge form

Everyone walking is welcome to take the pledge form and obtain pledges from family and friends to support our work. The members of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia local chapters along the rivers and bays of Southeastern Virginia are looking forward to this first annual event for MEET THE BLIND month.

Fairfax Chapter Hosts Indoor Rock Climbing in March

NFB_blind_people_indoor_rock_climb

On Saturday, March 12, 2016 at the Sport Rock indoor rock climbing center in Alexandria, 9 blind and vision impaired members of the National Federation of the Blind of Virginia took on the challenge of scaling 60 foot vertical heights by using just their hands, legs, and the determination to succeed.

Those who climbed that day were from several chapters in our NFB family. The chapters represented were: the Winchester Chapter, Fairfax Chapter and DC Chapter. The climbers were: Carolena Garrison, Chris Vincent Walker, John Bailey, Paula Kelsey, James, Thomas Gryder, Johanna Johnson, Joy Relton, Toby Austin, and James Dietz.

The ages, skill levels, and familiarity with the NFB philosophy of empowerment through skills and a positive attitude varied greatly among the participants.

When everyone arrived, , our indoor rock climbing instructor Christie and her assistant welcomed us and showed us how to adjust the waist harnesses which would connect the climbers with the safety rope. The group went two climbers at a time up either the 40 or 60 foot simulated rock wall which had hand and foot holds randomly carved in them. The challenge was to locate the nearest hold, stabilize your balance, and then pull yourself up to the next hold.

Chris Walker made it to the top on his second try. He made it half way on his first attempt. However, on his second attempt, he continued pushing himself passed where he had stopped before and continued till his head hit the ceiling. He knew then he had succeeded.

Johanna is new to the Federation and is tackling all the challenges RP can bring to one’s personal and professional life. You wouldn’t think Johanna had any challenges if you saw how she climb to the top of the wall and down 4 times in less than 90 minutes.

Two hours after we started, the climbers and their supportive spectators said over and over again what a great time they had. In fact, ideas for future activities were being bounced around. Some of the ideas were: horseback riding, tubing on a river, group dance classes, and Joy made sure everyone knew that she was voting to go skiing. Everyone agreed to keep in touch and to get together soon.