The Vigilant: May 2018

The Vigilant: May 2018

Joe Orozco, Editor

From the President’s Desk

In the past month, I was reminded about how much I love our Federation family. As many of you know, my wife’s father, Dr. Leonard Appel passed away on April 21. The outpouring of love and support to Sharon and we have been tremendous and I am grateful for the kindness and friendship in our Federation family. While we work together to accomplish great things, we are also there for each other.

Project RISE:

On Saturday, May 12, we held another great event where students learned new skills and expanded their capabilities through a transit and travel adventure. In addition to our project RISE team, we had talented volunteers assist including Conchita Hernandez, Maurice Peret, and Ollie cantos. Now, we are ramping up for a weekend long event at the NFB Jernigan Institute in June.

Code of Conduct:

Over the past month, I have had the pleasure to visit with members of the Peninsula, Tidewater and Greater Alexandria chapters. These meetings have been fun and enlightening. I am grateful to the hospitality and warmth from our chapter members and truly enjoy visiting with you. One topic of conversation was the code of Conduct. People ask how to sign.

To sign the Code of Conduct, simply send Tracy an email message with Section XI of the code of conduct in the body of the message. Where is says federation Leader, replace that text with your first and last name. The Code of Conduct can be found in the March Vigilant.

If people don’t have access to email or have other challenges, we will have some paper copies at the May 19 Board of Directors meeting

My target is to get signed copies from all affiliate elected officers, all chapter officers, and all division officers before the convention in July.

Visiting Chapters:

On April 19, I attended the Greater Alexandria Chapter’s first birthday party. This chapter holds a very engaging and interactive meeting and it was a blast. On May 12, I enjoyed attending a joint meeting of the Tidewater and Peninsula Chapters in Norfolk. I hope to visit more chapters in the coming months so feel free to let me know what you are doing and how I can help.

National Scholarship Finalists

Please join me in congratulating our two scholarship finalists Naim Abu-El Hawa and Sarah Patnaude.

Sarah, as you might recall, was elected to our affiliate board at last year’s convention. She recently finished her first year of graduate school at George Mason University. After graduating with her Master’s in Social Work, Sarah plans on becoming a victim advocate, where she hopes to help survivors of trauma regain their voice and take control of the steering wheel in their life. Beyond school and her work with the NFB, Sarah enjoys travelling and has a love for musicals. As a tenBroek Fellow this year, she looks forward to continuing to learn from Federationists across the country and using the knowledge and experiences she gains to strengthen the movement.

Naim is also very active in our affiliate. He is the vice-president of the Virginia Association of Blind Students and holds a board position in our Potomac Chapter.

These students will be with us at our national convention and I am thrilled to be cheering for them at the banquet.

National Convention

Our National Convention is fast approaching. In the April newsletter, we provided details about our responsibilities this year as one of the host affiliates. Shortly, we will provide details on how to sign up for a shift at the Virginia Table, the Welcome Table, the Hospitality Suite, or working at the Friday night Welcome Party. Additionally, we will need people to mentor first time convention attendees through the McDonald fellowship program and the Jernigan Convention Scholarship program. As you know, the convention only works when many volunteers step up to help. Please make time to assist us by taking a shift for these responsibilities. I look forward to working together with you at convention.

Yours in Service,

Tracy Soforenko
President, National Federation of the Blind of Virginia


This Month’s Words of Inspiration

“You can buy food, but not appetite; medicine but not health; knowledge but not wisdom; glitter, but not beauty; fun, but not joy; acquaintances, but not friends; servants, but not faithfulness; leisure, but not peace. You can have the husk of everything for money, but not the kernel.” — Arne Garborg


Ten Tips for a Resume that Gets You the Interview
By John Bailey

Project RISE is possible thanks in large part to the efforts of the volunteers who make each session come alive. John Bailey, president of the Fairfax Chapter, recently met with our students to discuss, among other employment tasks, drafting compelling resumes. Here are the tips he shared with the students, which you yourself might benefit from when you are ready to start searching for your first job or land that next position.

Let’s face it, the whole goal from searching online for a job, creating that perfect resume, talking to your career buddies about unadvertised job opportunities is to get you an interview. Getting face-to-face with your potential employer means that you are almost there in terms of getting the job you want. Once in the interview, you can let your skills, knowledge, and personality take over to dazzle so that you will get the offer. Once in the interview, you have all the power.

But, how do you get invited to that all-important interview? A lot of groundwork must happen first and one of the most important components of that work is having a resume that conveys just enough information about your abilities and professionalism to get hiring managers to want to see you in person.

I have been reviewing resumes from job seekers for over 20 years and they have varied greatly in their quality. From my experience, below are 10 of the easiest ways to supercharge your resume so that it is put into the ‘interview’ pile instead of the recycle bin.

1. Avoid typos and grammatical errors at all costs!

Would you go to a job interview with a blaring stain on your clothing? Of course not. So, why wouldn’t you take the same amount of care that you put into your clothing than you do in crafting an effective resume?

The unpleasant truth is, in the initial review of your resume, people are looking for reasons not to read it. And, grammatical errors can get your resume tossed quicker than any other reason. Take the time to review your resume for spelling and grammar mistakes. Then, have a friend you trust review it again.

2. Highlight Achievements rather than duties

It is all too easy to just copy your list of current duties and put them down in your resume. Employers really don’t care about what you did in your last job. They want to know what value you can bring to their organization if they hire you. In order to convey this effectively, rewrite your activities in terms of how you made things better (added value) at your last job. A great way to do this is to state how you made things better by quantifying the results. Ideally, use specific numbers. For example, ‘Oversaw training program for over a dozen employees increasing retention by 20 percent.”

Turning duties into accomplishments is just a matter of looking at things a little differently.

3. Write for the job you are applying for

As mentioned earlier, during the initial review of your resume, staff is looking for reasons to toss it in order to get through as many resumes as possible. To make your resume stand out as one that should be read completely, you should customize your resume so that they will want to read it. You accomplish this by ‘echoing’ back the keywords, skill sets, and terms used in the original job posting. Give them what they are looking for and make it easy to find!

4. Give them just enough information in your resume to get them to want to know more

Again, the goal of a well-crafted resume should be to get you the interview. You should just include enough information to whet the curiosity of the hiring manager to want to talk to you further. Save your life’s story for the novel.

6. Write a summary that allows you to shine

Unfortunately, resume summaries are one of the last parts of the resume to be written and the most neglected. Employers do read your career summary looking for the values and attitudes that would make you a good fit for their organization. Don’t skimp on this opportunity to shine. Put down your goals and how they will benefit the organization that hires you. A resume is a beauty contest and you should look your best at every opportunity.

7. Convey accomplishments by using action verbs

Telling a potential employer, you were ‘responsible’ for a duty bores them to tears. Expand on terms like responsible with action verbs like, organized, implemented, oversaw, enhanced, etc. Again, it is all about what value you can bring to the hiring organization.

8. Even volunteers have value

Here is a great tip for new job seekers who feel their resume is a bit short on accomplishments. Every resume should include some references to unpaid employment. A skill is a skill whether or not you receive monetary compensation for it.

9. Keep your resume easy to read

People who read resumes for a living have a hard-enough job. Make it easy for them to find the information they are looking for by using lots of white space, using bold or highlighted text to emphasize important terms or skills that the employer might be looking for, use a minimum of fonts, and most importantly, use a font size that is easy on the eyes.

10. Continue updating your resume even if you aren’t looking for a new job

Leaving all the great things you have accomplished to memory is a receipt for disaster. You will forget. So, continually update your resume with newly acquired skills and talents so that when it does come time for a job move, you won’t be scratching your head trying to remember what you did last year.

In conclusion, resumes are the key for unlocking doors to interviews. Your resume should scream value, competence, and professionalism. Just a bit of extra work on your resume can make a world of difference in getting that dream interview.


Join the NFB of Virginia team for Braille Literacy

The following is from President Soforenko. Please take note of the deadline noted below. Our sincere apologies for running this issue so late in the month, but hopefully some of you will still find the means to participate in this worthwhile activity.

Join Federationists and friends from across the Mid Atlantic for a fun 6K Run / Walk at the NFB Six Dot Dash in Baltimore.

While some of us will be running, many including myself will probably walk.

On Sunday, June 3, the National Federation of the Blind Six Dot Dash will begin at 8:00 AM on the streets of Federal Hill in Baltimore.

We have established an NFB of Virginia team (called Virginia Federationists) and you could join us to help us field the largest team at this year’s event. There will be members from Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia and hopefully other affiliates across the Mid Atlantic.

Some of us will be going up Saturday evening, June 2 and staying at the NFB National Center. If you are interested in joining the NFB of Virginia team, please email me by Sunday, May 20. This is especially important for those hoping to stay at the NFB National Center. President Riccobono has generously offered to let us stay at the national Center but there will be no food provided by the center and we will need to provide a set of individuals who will be staying shortly after May 20.

Please know that you are responsible for the $39 online pre-registration fee ($40 on race day) and costs for transportation and a Saturday evening meal at a restaurant in Baltimore. There will not be a cost for our stay at the NFB National Center’s conference center. We will bring up a simple breakfast of bagels and orange juice for Sunday morning.

Click here for more details on the Six Dot Dash, go to the below web link:

Click here to register.

I found the Event Bright web site to be frustrating with a screen reader but I eventually muddled through it. Our team is called Virginia Federationists.

I hope you can join us for this fun morning with Federationists and friends from across the Mid Atlantic.


Nonprofit Development: Grant Writing 101
By Joe Orozco

In the coming years our affiliate will implement a diverse fundraising strategy to make it possible for us to have more services like Project RISE. One of those funding strategies will likely be grant writing, and while grant writing will make the most sense at the affiliate level, where we can project the greatest impacts, that does not mean chapters and divisions cannot pursue their own grant writing strategies to help fund activities they would like to sponsor. Here’s a starting point to thinking about grant writing.

Do you want to know the top three reasons grant seekers fail to land an award? First, the applicant’s work does not match the funder’s priorities. Second, the applicant does not follow directions about when and how to submit a proposal, and third, the applicant fails to communicate with the funder before and after the application process.

The reasons for these mistakes are as diverse as the organizations that make them. Based on my professional experience, here are a few guesses why the mistakes persist:

  • Why pay a professional when we can just use community volunteers?
  • We just got a sizable grant from a well-known foundation that will surely give us credibility.
  • If we apply to 100 opportunities, someone is bound to give us money!
  • We can’t meet all the application guidelines but meet enough of them that we may as well try.
  • We’re doing such great work that funders would be stupid, heartless and insensitive not to pick us.
  • We’ve got the grant, so why should we keep communicating with the funder?

Grant writing is not exact science. Only scammers can promise you a near 100% success rate, but that doesn’t mean you can’t increase your likelihood of attracting lucrative grant awards.

Before you apply for a grant, consider these basic questions:

  • Does the funder sponsor work in your city and state?
  • Does your mission statement neatly fit into one of the funder’s program areas?
  • Will the grant fund an existing program, or will you need to create a new one?
  • Does the deadline give you enough time to gather all your materials and prepare the proposal?
  • If you were sitting on the other side of the table, would you be eager to select your own application?

Cultivating a healthy grant portfolio is difficult but not impossible. If you want to tackle it yourself, you’ll be far ahead of the curve if you avoid the common pitfalls that put so many grant seekers in the recycle bin.


The Parsons Report

Robert Parsons is involved in all kinds of tasks and projects in the affiliate. Here are a couple of his recent undertakings, and because we were late in putting out this issue, we were unable to properly announce the fact the student division provided lunch at the most recent affiliate board meeting. But thank you to Robert and his teams for all they do for Virginia.

VABS:

The Virginia Student Division is, as usual, hard at work at promoting the continued message of the Federation that our future leaders are cultivated through community, regional, and national efforts of advocacy and confidence building.

VABS will have a full presence at the National Convention, where we will continue our fundraising efforts. VABS will be raffling off Uber, Lift, and Amazon gift cards for the entirety of the week, with a winning ticket being drawn every two days.

Finally, from August 10-12, the Virginia Association of Blind Students will be participating in the NFB Southeastern Student Seminar. This weekend event will see the combined advocacy, confidence building, and leadership skills of national and state leaders disseminated to the students of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington D. C.. Any students interested in joining VABS or attending any of these events can contact Robert Parsons, President, at 804,801.7674.

Richmond Chapter:

The Richmond chapter is hard at work at continuing its tradition of being a local and statewide leader in innovative social planning. The annual Richmond chapter spring picnic will take place on Saturday, June 9, 2018 at the Richmond ARC Park, located at 3600 Saunders Avenue, Richmond, VA 23227. For more information, please contact Gerald Meredith, event planner, at 804.243.3980.


NFB Pledge

I pledge to participate actively in the effort of the National Federation of the Blind to achieve equality, opportunity, and security for the blind; to support the policies and programs of the Federation; and to abide by its constitution.